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Pierre Alechinsky: Margin and Center 










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a Pierre Alechinsky: Margin and Center 

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Bougival, 1985 



SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM LIBRARY 



Pierre Alechinsky: Margin and Center 



This exhibition has received generous support from the 
Commissariat General aux Relations Internationales 
de la Communaute Francaise de Belgique, Brussels, 
and the Association Francaise d'Action Artistique, 
Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Paris. 



Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York 






This Exhibition is Dedicated to John Lefebre. 



Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publn 
Alechinsky, Pierre, 1927- 

Pierre Alechinsky. 

Catalog of an exhibition held at the Solomon 
R. Guggenheim Museum. 

Bibliography: pp. 168-169 

1. Alechinsky, Pierre, 1927- — Exhibitions. 
I. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. II. Title. 
N6973.A4A4 1987 760'. 092^ 86-31380 
ISBN 0-89207-061-7 

cover: With Michel Portal. 1980 (cat. no. 103). Collection Solomon R. 

Guggenheim Museum, New York, Anonymous Gift 

Drawings reproduced throughout the catalogue which are not in the 

exhibition are from Pierre Alechinsky, he bureau du titre, Fata 

Morgana, Montpellier, 1983; Gilbert Lascault, Arrondissements, Reperes, 

Daniel Lelong, Pans, 1983; Michel Butor and Michel Sicard, ABC 

de Correspondance, Reperes, Daniel Lelong, Paris, 1985; and Michel 

Butor and Michel Sicard, Alechinsky dans le texte, Editions Galilee, Paris, 1985 

Published by The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York, 1987 

Copyright © 1987 by The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York 

"Central Park" copyright © 1987 by Octavio Paz; English translation 

copyright © 1987 by Eliot Weinberger 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Lenders to the Exhibition 7 

Preface and Acknowledgments Thomas M. Messer 8 

Central Park Octavio Paz 10 

Bordering on Something Central Pierre Alechinsky and Michael Gibson 15 



Works in the Exhibi 



33 



Chronology t49 

Selected Exhibitions 156 

Selected Bibliography 168 

Photographic Credits 171 




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LENDERS TO THE EXHIBITION 

Micky and Pierre Alechinsky 

Norman and Irma Braman 

Jerome and Marlene Brody 

Mr. and Mrs. Michel David- Weill, New York 

Michel Fribourg, New York 

Guy Georges, Paris 

Mr. and Mrs. Melvin A. Colder 

General-Major Aviateur P. de Groof, Brussels 

Michel Guy, Pans 

Pierre Hebey 

Stephane Janssen, Beverly Hills 

J. P. Ledeur, Paris 

Marion Lefebre 

Joyce and Samir Mansour, Paris 

Meridian Partners, Inc., New York 

Mr. and Mrs. N. Richard Miller 

Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Mindhn 

Jacques Putman, Paris 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Karel P. van Stuijvenberg, Caracas 

Baroness Van Zuylen 

The Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh 

Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice 

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York 

Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humlebaek, Denmark 

Musee National d'Art Moderne, Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris 

Museum Ludwig, Cologne 

Nordjyllands Kunstmuseum, Aalborg, Denmark 

The State Museums of the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg 

Lens Fine Art, Antwerp 
Galerie Birch, Copenhagen 
Galerie Maeght Lelong, Paris 



PREFACE AND ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 



The trauma and the devastations of World War II that visited the 
embattled European continent required complex adjustments in the 
creative realm. While American painting, benefiting from a wave of 
European emigration, experienced a marked invigoration, artists in 
Europe were only gradually moving from destruction and occupation to 
an uncertain peace. France, nonetheless, was expected to continue 
leadership in the realm of high art. 

Such expectations were fulfilled in part by the surviving Parisian demi- 
gods who continued to be influential, as well as by an emerging gen- 
eration of abstract painters nourished and encouraged by the rich 
traditions of European modernism. But opposing tendencies, which 
seemed radical and unaccommodating at the time, surfaced in short 
order. Among these, the examples set by Jean Dubuffet in France and 
by the Cobra artists in Denmark, Belgium and The Netherlands were 
the most conspicuous. Pierre Alechinsky, surely one of the youngest 
participants in the shortlived but influential Cobra movement, was even 
then recognizable as standard bearer for the Belgians, marked as he was 
by extraordinary talent and early achievement. 
Cobra has long since been recognized as a meaningful chapter in the 
history of modern art, and while, happily, a few of its original adherents 
are still working vigorously, many others have left the scene. Pierre 
Alechinsky today is, by general consensus, the most distinguished 
among those who, having outlived Cobra, continue to assert valid and 
emphatic contemporary leadership. Presenting Alechinsky at the height 
of his powers, this exhibition thus becomes an acknowledgment of the 
artist's stature and achievement. Although it deliberately eschews the 
conventional retrospective format, it nevertheless takes in a broad range 
of work. 

The exhibition theme, Margin and Center, was formulated during ex- 
tensive conversations that preceded selection, as we became aware of 
the pervasive formal and iconographic presence of the two components 
that comprise the exhibition's title. But in focusing upon it one should 



bear in mind that this conspicuous device applies only to a small frac- 
tion of the artist's total oeuvre and therefore appears magnified by its 
isolation. 

The contributors to the present catalogue, Michael Gibson and Octavio 
Paz, as well as Pierre Alechinsky himself, to all of whom we express our 
appreciation, have found words that allow the theme of the exhibition 
to reach beyond its visual dimension. We acknowledge as well the par- 
ticipation of Guggenheim Museum staff members on the project. The 
artist's closest collaborator was Lisa Dennison, the Guggenheim's As- 
sistant Curator, who was instrumental in selecting the exhibition and 
deserves credit for staging it. The editing of the catalogue was the re- 
sponsibility of Carol Fuerstein, Editor. Nina Nathan Schroeder, Cura- 
torial Assistant, and Diana Murphy, Assistant Editor, were also 
involved with many aspects of the exhibition and catalogue. 

Pierre Alechinsky: Margin and Center has benefited from the financial 
support of the Commissariat General aux Relations Internationales de 
la Communaute Francaise de Belgique, Brussels, and the Association 
Francaise d'Action Artistique, Paris. We greatly value the assistance of 
these organizations. The exhibition is scheduled to tour in this country 
and abroad and will be seen after the Guggenheim's initial showing at 
the Des Moines Art Center, the Kunstverein Hannover e.V. and the 
Musees Royaux des Beaux-Arts de Belgique, Art Moderne, Brussels. 
Neither the original presentation nor the tour could have been arranged 
without the generosity of many lenders whose names appear elsewhere 
in this catalogue, unless they have requested anonymity. Our gratitude 
is herewith conveyed to all of these individuals and institutions. 
My final word of thanks is addressed to the artist, with whom I have 
maintained a long and rewarding friendship. 

Thomas M. Messer, Director 

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation 



Octavio Paz 



Central Park 



The Argument: Some say that, given the exterior world exists, one must 
deny it; others say that, given the world does not exist, one must invent 
it; and still others, that only the inner world exists. Pierre Alechinsky 
turns his head and, saying nothing, paints a rectangle in which he en- 
closes Central Park in New York, in the late afternoon, seen from the 
window of his closed eyes. The rectangle surrounds the four sides of the 
park, and is divided into irregular spaces, themselves rectangles, like the 
boxes in a theater, the cells in a convent or the cages in a zoo. Inside 
each box swarm bizarre creatures that are somehow vaguely familiar: 
Are they they or us} Do we look at them, or are they looking at us? In- 
side the rectangle, Central Park has been transformed into a green, 
black and golden Cobra: Is it an anamorphosis of Alice, the Queen of 
Diamonds in our sleepwalking deck? The painting is not a vision but a 
spell. 



Green and black thickets, bare spots, 

leafy river knotting into itself: 

it runs motionless through the leaden buildings 

and there, where light turns to doubt 

and stone wants to be shadow, it vanishes. 

Don't cross Central Park at >iight. 



Day falls, night flares up, 
Alechinsky draws a magnetic rectan^ 
a trap of lines, a corral of ink: 
inside there is a fallen beast, 
two eyes and a twisting rage. 
Do;? 7 cross Central Park at night. 



There are no exits or entrances, 

enclosed in a ring of light 

the grass beast sleeps with eyes open, 

the moon exhumes razors, 

the water in the shadows has become green fire. 

Don't cross Central Park at night. 

There are no entrances but everyone, 

in the middle of a phrase dangling from the telephone, 

from the top of the fountain of silence or laughter, 

from the glass cage of the eye that watches us, 

everyone, all of us are falling in the mirror. 

Don't cross Central Park at night. 

The mirror is made of stone and the stone now is shadow, 

there are two eyes the color of anger, 

a ring of cold, a belt of blood, 

there is a wind that scatters the reflections 

of Alice, dismembered in the pond. 

Don't cross Central Park at night. 

Open your eyes: now you are inside yourself, 
you sail in a boat of monosyllables 
across the mirror-pond, you disembark 
at the Cobra dock: it is a yellow taxi 
that carries you to the land of flames 
across Central Park at night. 



Santander, 5 September 1986 



LuedhvElmt Wc.nkmcr 



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ugival, 1983 



Pierre Alechinsky and Michael Gibson 



Bordering on Something Central 



michael GIBSON: Let's talk about your marginal com- 
ments. 

pierre alechinsky: I pass. No I don't after all. I'll trump with one of 
Henri Matisse's remarks: "I always start from the frame." 

M.G.: What do you make of that statement? 

p.a.: Beyond the frame there is . . . well, all the rest! The roving hordes, 
the outside world, so powerful when you compare it to a small rect- 
angle of paper or canvas. I sense then how urgent it is, not only to con- 
centrate on the composition of the rectangle itself, but also on that of its 
frontiers, on the margins. 

Progressively, as I produced my paintings with margins (I have been 
painting such works episodically, ever since I did Central Park in 1965 
[cat. no. 1]), I found myself stressing the rectangle, underscoring it even, 
whether by means of a fringe of pictures around the center, or by 
materializing a border. 

M.G.: You did this with the idea of defining a separate 
space in which a different order of event occurs. Right? 

p.a.: And at the same time to annex the frame, to make it part of the pic- 
ture, rather (let's say in passing) in the manner that an engraver uses a 
border in his woodcut to prevent the roller from touching areas that 
have been hollowed out. This is the sort of limitation that can turn out 
to be an aesthetic advantage — depending on the engraver's talent. I 
started out as a printer and I have made use of some of the craftsman's 
notions, tricks or habits in my painting. Marginalia — in the form of 
notes, addenda, subtitles, summaries — have existed ever since the in- 
vention of the book. Proof corrections find their proper place in the 
margin too; they indicate and countermand alongside the column of 



15 



type. Authors use the margin to modify the text on which they are 
working. It can be quite spectacular at times. Lithographers use it to test 
a tool and try their hand before setting to work. In doing so they trace 
minute and often charming preparatory sketches, which are erased be- 
fore the actual printing, once the first test print has been run off. Some 
rare proofs of this kind are occasionally to be found, described in print 
and book collector's catalogues in such terms as: "... despite a few 
rust spots, this is a fine proof of the first state with marginal com- 
ments." A term I appropriated. 

M.G.: Your own modus operandi also includes the as- 
sembling and mounting on canvas of the work you ini- 
tially painted on paper. This is at once an additional 
business of composition and a manual task. 

P. A.: Which invites a detour. It is a fortunate thing, really, that painting 
should demand such a wide range of chores. One would be rather ill-ad- 
vised to tackle literature head on! But the very act of painting requires a 
whole ritual of mcantatory approach. It is this specific mixture, three 
parts chores to one part creation, that yields a painting. 

m.g.: Let's talk about the work that stands before us: 
After Us, 1980 (cat. no. 46). 




Bougival, 1983 



16 



p.a.: The center, both mineral and aquatic, says: color. The border com- 
posed of black and white drawings confirms that the subject of the cen- 
tral part is cascades and moving vapors that fall back into water. The 
viewer's eye is led on through a giratory movement, a cycle. The subject 
dealt with in the middle of the painting was less apparent: just a deluge 
of blue .... This impelled me to add some clarifications outside the 
field. And so I painted one rectangle after another, around the big one 
in the middle, and then adding the comments within their individual 
frames, each one with its own problems of composition [After Us). 

M.G.: It might conceivably evoke the way a sixteenth- 
century tapestry is organized — or even an oriental carpet. 

p.a.: The image in itself is isolated and forsaken, therefore vulnerable. 
From time to time it requires protection. The access border, the com- 
mentaries reassure. The painting must stand alone in its struggle against 
indifference. The viewer is soon enough inclined to turn his eyes to 
other sights! The image is not always self-sufficient. It needs a specific 
body of reference to catch and hold the passing glance. 

M.G.: All this work of composition prompts the eye to 
come and go. 

p.a.: From the larger to the smaller. These paintings are intended to be 
seen in two ways — both from a distance and close-up. Just as I made 
them: first the center, then the margins. 

M.G.: First the center, yes. I suppose you allow yourself a 
pause between the two? 

P.A.: Once the center is done I grant myself a moment of respite. I float 
around or turn to other tasks; the break can last several days, after 
which I begin working on the border; but it can also last several weeks 
or months. In exceptional cases, even several years. No schedule, no 
deadline. No obligation either. Agoraphobia Square (cat. no. zo) (a 
painting, done in 1966, that gives a good idea of where I stood after the 
twenty years I had remained faithfully wedded to oil painting) waited 
for three years before receiving, in acrylic at last, the developments on 
its frame. In any event, I observe the center before venturing into the 
margins. But, as you know, I have also painted and I still paint a lot of 
images without- marginalia. Evidently they are not a necessity each and 
every time. 



17 



M.G.: What is your understanding of the notion of 
"spontaneity" which played such an important role in 
the theories of the Cobra movement? 

P.A.: Spontaneity was the rallying cry of Cobra in contrast to the "pure 
psychic automatism" favored, no doubt with some extra charge of 
idealism, by Andre Breton. This "purity" was dismantled by Asger Jorn 
in an article published in Cobra in 1949: "Discours aux pingouins" 
("Speech to the Penguins"). Did Jorn want to convince the armless 
man? 1 

The action of painting leads the painter to an awareness of the material 
nature of his craft, much more so than a writer who is never sufficiently 
conscious of the material act of writing, of the tracing of words. This 
notion was significantly amplified by Christian Dotremont, who de- 
rived his logograms from it. 2 Marcel Havrenne' spoke of a poetry "in 
which the script itself has its word to say." Both of them referred to the 
impact of the physical act of writing on the imagination. Implicit in this 
attitude is a mistrust of any idea that is too precise at the outset: it can 
blind one to new ideas that might otherwise appear while work is in 
progress. Everything significant occurs within this creative "mean- 
while" (which is one of the mysteries of art). Before is irrelevant, we are 
told. And after, we stand before a fait accompli, a definite result, defi- 
nitely locked into its own moment in time, and which we call a painting. 

M.c,.: So that, in this view, the term "spontaneity" refers 
to a form of interaction between conception and execu- 
tion, the manner in which the physical act of painting in- 
flects the actual result. It implies a readiness to welcome 
whatever may yet, quite unpredictably, occur. But I also 
notice, in actual tact, beyond the polemical slogan 
"spontaneity," a manner of paradoxical tension: on the 
one hand this openness, availability, "spontaneity," and 
on the other a demanding attitude, an order, a disci- 
pline. Spontaneity, in this sense, does not imply a sur- 
render to mere impulse .... 



1 Asger Jorn (19 14-7?). The French tirle of the article mentioned 
here hinges on a remote allusion: a variety of penguins is known as 
"manchot" (without hands) in French because their wings are reminis- 
cent of arms without hands. 

2 Christian Dotremont (1912-79). Belgian poet and artist, cofounder 
of Cobra in 1948 and inventor of the acronym (COpenhagen-BRus- 
sels-Amsterdam). For logograms, see Abrupt Fable and Seismographic 
Armful (cat. nos. 38, 93), made in collaboration with Alechinsky. 

3 Marcel Havrenne (1912-57). Belgian poet who belonged to Cobra. 




WithD- 
1976 



Abrupt Fable, Brussels, 



pa.: The less demanding, the less visual person will indeed surrender- 
the temptation is too great. 

M.C.: And he will invoke spontaneity. 

p.a.: As an extenuating circumstance! 



M.G.: I bring this up because I gave the matter some 
thought a few years ago, after a conversation I had with 
Dotremont. It occurred to me then that there was an 
abyss between what he actually meant by spontaneity 
and the vulgar, unthinking meaning the term usually is 
given. In Dotremont's case this "spontaneity" was 
coupled with a considerable discipline. When he drew 
his logogram he never allowed the idea of the text to 
precede by any great length of time the actual act of set- 
ting it down on paper. And not only that: if the result 
did not satisfy him, he rarely made use of the same text a 
second time but went on to invent another one. His 
"spontaneity," consequently, was never devoid of self- 
discipline, and his craft was the result of an interaction 
between openness and stricture. 




Bougii 



P.A.: It's a strange thing: we create limits for ourselves. We invent a 
game called "painting," governed by disciplines which, all told, are ex- 
tremely demanding. The artist-legislator is also his own judge. He can- 
not, however, easily lie to himself, to the extent that he can only feel 
pleased or displeased by the line he has just drawn. So he has no other 
choice but to strive after a perfection that cannot exist — "perfection is 
death," said Jorn. And only in the long run can we measure the scope of 
the disciplines we have imposed upon ourselves. Discipline! An ex- 
travagant word to be coupled with such spacious freedom! 

m.g.: As for the openness or availability we mentioned, 
it is apparent in the very act by which the line is 
drawn. 

p.a.: And which the eye trails. 



M.G.: And this is why we can easily recognize a line 
drawn by Alechinsky. Your draftsman's script, like your 
handwriting, belongs to you alone. And your graphic 



idiom can also be recognized in the choice of a certain 
format, a way of "centering," of organizing the work as 
a whole. 

p.a.: This concern with composition is the result of a handicap I have. I 
am left-handed. Educators ordered me to hold my pen in my right hand, 
the awkward one, but fortunately allowed me to clutch a pencil or 
brush in my left one. Painting and drawing, as you can see, do not enjoy 
the same status as writing. I was soon aware of the flow that runs from 
right to left instead of in the direction followed by a reader's eye. Yet 
this is the direction in which a viewer surveys a painting. Consequently 
the situation, as far as I am concerned, is the following: I must allow a 
free rein to my reverse dynamics, while making allowances for a few 
features that will permit the viewer (myself included) to return to the 
cursive flow derived from the act of reading. Hence my predilection for 
the printer's shop, where I have spent so many hours looking into 
Alice's mirror where all that has been reversed is again set right. 

m.g.: So the eye runs in a set direction, not only when it 
reads a text, but also when it takes in a picture. 

p.a.: This direction is perceptible in the way the brush settles on the 
paper, rests there and leaves it. Painters discover this if they are curious 
enough to look at their painting in a mirror. On the other hand, being 
quite accustomed to seeing our own features reversed, we dislike our- 
selves in a photograph. A photograph is shocking to its subject. 

m.g.: Have you, in any way, taken advantage of your 
handicap? 

P.A.: I would never have been so attentive to composition if I had the 
blinding good fortune of being right-handed! 

My own adventures with writing have made me aware of script in gen- 
eral. I often view a painting as a mass of information. I discover the 
hand and personality, hesitant or determined, sensitive or dreary, pre- 
tentious, measured, captivating, precise, brutal, compassionate, refined, 
open, flustered, sovereign, adorable, etc. All that, and much more be- 
sides, is to be read in the lines of a painting. 



m.g.: Do you perceive an affinity between your artistic 
script and the Far Eastern technique of calligraphy? 

pa.: Our perception of Far Eastern script doesn't go beyond its graphic 
aspect. We don't understand what it is saying. But we discover a com- 
parable graphic serpentine (our own manner of tying and untying a 
line), if we take the trouble of holding a page we have written to the 
light, and looking at it from behind, reversed, so that we can no longer 
make out the written text. I sometimes write backwards with my left 
hand. In 1955 1 traveled to Japan to study the calligraphers and film 
them at work on sheets of paper laid out on the floor or placed flat on a 
low table. In any event, I have chosen to use the same equipment and 
have acquired a passionate love for paper. 

But the precepts of a master must necessarily be disappointing. "What 
should one do to become a great calligrapher?" And the immediate an- 
swer is: "Sit upright and breathe properly." And Bonnard too, advising 
a young painter, says no more than: "Always have a clean rag." 

A calligrapher or a writer can get a kind of satisfaction from tracing an 
entire sentence or text at one go. Their state of mind is different from 
that of a painter who traces a form here or there on his canvas, then 
stands back to judge the effect before continuing. The calligrapher does 
not pause. He writes cursively and appreciates the formal beauty arising 
out of his tool, his paper, the movement of his hand inflected by the 
literary content. A painter does not transmit words; his drawings have 
no connection with syntax. 

M.G.: Have you noticed a change in your script as time 
goes on? 

P.A.: Indeed, a hand armed with a brush acquires practice, encounters 
surprises and improves with time. A line that expresses at once the art- 
ist's idea, his moments of hesitation, the shortcuts of his thoughts and 
of his decisions, his energy with its phases of acceleration and of subsid- 
ing pleases me more than any exaggeratedly neutral one. 

M.G.: And all of this is apparent before us, here in a 
broken line, or there in the hatchmarks that define a 
frame. 

P.A.: In vital chaffings, pauses, wrenches that are, one must hope, per- 
ceptible, in the imprint of the brush that reveals the power of a forceful 
gesture or the delicacy of a caress. 



m.g.: What sort of brushes do you use? 

pa.: Preferably goat hair mounted on bamboo. Wolf fur too. Though 
the so-called wolf may well be no more than some unfortunate dog! 
"Wolf" naturally sounds more impressive. In any event the manufactur- 
ers of Far Eastern brushes claim that they are made of the hairs of this 
noble and dangerous creature. 



m.g.: Looking at such works as Chromatic Buoy (cat. 
no. 75), based on the rubbing of a circular bench, or 
Street Pepper (cat. no. 81), based on rubbings of a cast- 
iron manhole cover, a question comes to mind: Just 
what kind of interest do you take in the symbolic value 
of, say, the circle or the wheel? 

p. A. : A painting can evoke different associations each time we look at 
it — and consequently different ideas. Dotremont said: "A painting is a 
ventriloquist's doll." This leads us to the literary problem of choosing 
titles. 

When it comes to thinking up a title, the general impression, a detail, 
some circumstance unrelated to pictorial matters can provide a clue. 
Each unknown painting must provoke its own title. This explains why 
the "entitling painter" has almost more experience than a writer. 1 have 
had to find titles for several dozen drawings at a go. "Be more specific, 
please," says the title to the painter. 

I have published several books with the word "title" on the cover. The 
matter obviously preoccupies me. I wrote Titres et pains perdus in 
1965; then Le test du titre, in which I published the responses of sixty- 
one personalities I had asked to think up titles for six of my drawings. 
And finally Le bureau du titre, a sequence of titles presented without 
any corresponding pictures, so that they might be savored on their own. 
As for my titreurs d'elite, 4 many of whom are now dead (Rene Magritte, 
Jean Paulhan, Francois Truffaut . . . and so recently Joyce Mansour), 
most of them, quite independently of one another, had found some sort 
of common denominator. Much to my surprise! 



4. This untranslatable pun combines the notion of tireur d'elite, a 
sharpshooter, and titreur, a term coined by Alechinsky to signify a per- 
son who finds a title for a painting. A titreur d'elite is consequently an 
expert at inventing titles. 



M.( , My question about symbolic or mythic content 
was prompted by the fact that you quite recently chose 
to produce a series of paintings dealing with circular 
forms. 

pa.: I've been involved with wheels for a long time, and making rub- 
bings of them too. I even wrote a book entitled Roue libre for Albert 
Skira in 1969. At that time I had not yet noticed the cast-iron manhole 
covers in the streets, but I had painted Star and Disaster (cat. no. 19) 
based on a pattern of concentric circles. 

M.G.: As far as content is concerned, there are obviously 
... 1 was about to say, "universal symbols." When 
someone draws a circle he brings about, how shall 1 put 
it, a sort of . . . 

p. a.: Statement. 

M.G.: I was thinking more of a state of mind. We collect 

ourselves, our thoughts or feelings, inside a circle with a 

certain degree of fascination. Stage directors are aware 

of this and make good use of the inclination. So there is Bou S lva1 ' I9 , 7 ^ w ' th P 01 " 

, /- 1 ■ 11 1 traits or Mickv and lorn 

some irony in the act 01 taking manhole covers and turn- 
ing them into mandalas. 

P.A.: Derision, yes, but marked with a touch of admiration. A distortion 
of derision. My admiration for the anonymous work of the foundrymen 
has its share in this. I have been attentive to the variety of decorative 
motives on these cast-iron plates which the French administration refers 
to as "pieces du mobilier urbaui." This leads me back to recollections of 
childhood (rubbing a com with a pencil) or to Max Ernst (Max, that 
lucid child). They are technically rubbings. As it happens, they are also 
evocative both of childhood and of China. 

Is it so unusual to pay attention to these covers shaped like mandalas? A 
man walking, Jean Dubuffet once observed, is more inclined to look at 
the ground than straight ahead. Gravity plays its part. I took those ex- 
tremely heavy plates that communicate with the catacombs of New 
York, out of whose infernal depths gray fumaroles arise, and turned 
them into solar wheels: suspended gates of hell! 

Other enigmatic forms have come to squat in my paintings. "Universal 
symbols" I am sometimes told, that also occur in sacred art. But in fact, 
my own art is profane. I am an atheist, and insistent upon this fact, 




though I do feel an affinity for such things, and am always stirred, for 
instance, by Johann Sebastian Bach's Saint Matthew Passion — stirred, 
but without hope. And hopelessly so. 

M.G.: You keep your distance from content. 

p.a.: It's more a matter of reserve. 

M.G.: Of irony, perhaps, masking a modesty which in 
turn masks a content? 



P.A.: Long ago I elaborated a vocabulary made of images. I drew from 
things laid out on my table next to the paper and the ink bottle — ex- 
ceedingly humble things (if you will forgive the pathetic fallacy, of at- 
tributing an attitude such as modesty to pebbles, roots and orange 
peels). And then, emerging from them, like sequences of free associa- 
tions or like puns, I saw all my lady-loves appear, and also the feathered 
headgear of the Gilles dancers of the Carnaval de Binche (suddenly so 
close to those of -the Mayas), and volcanic eruptions, spirals, volutes, 
the meanders of a river turning into a lane, a shoelace, a necessary 
snake. 



M.G.: About this matter of content, I would rather say 
that we are dealing with a symbolic material inherent in 
society itself, of which a highly elaborate and formalized 
version is found in the various religions. But this fund of 
images is already present in the language we are taught, 
in education and even in good manners. This thing we 
call "culture" is a free and creative elaboration, by all 
human societies, of a fund inherited from the animal 
societies from which we are descended. (I have no use 
for sociobiology, by the way, which Marshall Sahlins 
has devastatingly criticized.) These societies also have 
their symbolic order, as any ethologist can tell, rooted in 
behavior. No society can function without it, but in our 
own case it assumes much vaster proportions because it 
takes the shape of a symbolic language which refers to 
the meaning and value of all things. 
This aspect can easily be neglected, no doubt because 
our way of describing the world has favored the indi- 
vidual self-perception, taking it in isolation and artifi- 
cially placing it under glass. As Gavroche might have 
said, it is, in a sense, la faute a Descartes — for Descartes 
(but Locke too), based his philosophy on individual self- 
awareness and thus sent into eclipse those aspects of this 
awareness which arose out of the prehuman collectivity, 
although they are, in fact, quite as fundamental as the 
individual aspect. This has always been so, of course, 
because we inherited this social ground, with its basic 
behavioral symbolism (which has been studied by Kon- 
rad Lorenz, among others) from our prehuman ances- 
tors. We inherited it as a basic pattern, but we also 
elaborated it (and continue to elaborate it) in a way that 
allows us to designate goals and values beyond the im- 
mediate and tangible ones that alone concern animal 
societies. And it is primarily this ordering of a society 
and its goals (inevitably through symbolic terms) that 
constitutes the material of culture. . . . 

The collective order of culture has its inhuman aspect 
because it often commands a blindly tribal assent, but it 
is also that which, in an entirely positive sense, goes 
beyond the individual and represents the things for 
which the individual is willing to give all of himself, and 
even his life if necessary. It consequently commands 
both the most immoral and the most ethical forms of be- 
havior. In the latter case, it refers us to the values that 
give life a substantiality and a meaning. And all of these 




z6 



can ultimately be condensed into, and signified by an en- 
tirely rudimentary symbol, a circle, for instance. It is far 
too easy to treat such things as though they were mere 
speculative theory. Yet when someone draws a circle be- 
fore us, under certain (theatrical or religious) cir- 
cumstances, it can call to mind something that has a 
bearing on a community or a communion — or again, 
with negative implications, a casting of spells, a separa- 
tion or, in a better sense yet, a reserved space, a "pas- 
sage" towards transcendence, in other words towards 
"what is not there" or "not yet there," though it is of 
momentous importance to us: our life goal. And when a 
person deals with forms, as you do, he is constantly 
making use of such things, be it a circle, or a sequence of 
images that suggest a narrative, even if the narrative, as 
it happens in your work, has no definable content. 

PA.: I was recently showing a friend some paintings composed of rub- 
bings, Chromatic Buoy among them. And he declared that the trace of 
these cast-iron entities appeared more important than the objects them- 
selves, in the same way the hollow imprint of a vanished fossil becomes 
more affecting than the actual fossil. The fossil is gone, the trace re- 
mains. The negative concept is more intense than the positive one. 
Whereupon he began to talk about Tantrism. I replied that as soon as 
we see a circle anywhere Tantrism will inevitably be mentioned. 

Yet walking through the flea-market years ago I had, despite my own 
fathomless unknowing, been drawn to a Tantric image which I found so 
beautiful that I carried it home with me. Had it been hanging on my 
studio wall for so long that I no longer could see it? When people recog- 
nize "universal symbols" in my work I sometimes recoil, as though the 
association were undeserved. A reflex. As if to say: "I have nothing to 
do with this." 

m.g.: You are perhaps a bit wary of any interpretation 
that might be suggestive of mysticism? 

P.A.: The truth is that I enjoy coincidences. Nature and culture, in bits 
and pieces, run through us with their symbols and obscurities, thus pro- 
ducing various beneficial short-circuits. 

m.g.: One might suppose that the "sacred symbols," at 
the outset, refer to a form of experience that does not 
necessarily derive from any set theory, nor any 
dogma .... 



2-7 



P.A.: Looking at the Apocalypse tapestries in Angers I tell myself that in 
those days 1 would have enjoyed (illusion!) drawing clouds and 
monsters as crude and elegant as those. I recognize these same lines in 
my own work. And when, for instance, I depict a sort of fortress wall 
from another age, I should not be surprised if others begin to think of 
more specific subjects I might not willingly touch upon myself, but 
which appear according to the fancies of my brush .... 
A painting is a revealing slip! 



M.G.: Here is a painting that does not exactly have mar- 
ginal comments. I would be inclined to see a narrative 
sequence, after the fashion of polyptychs .... 

P.A.: One might well diagnose a hypertrophy of marginalia complicated 
by a disappearance of the center. 

M.G.: Your marginalia have, a bit too easily, been com- 
pared to the comic-strip form. I would prefer to see an 
affinity with the narrative idiom of the quattrocento 
frescoes. 

p.a.: If any comic-strip style did influence me, it was the black and white 
variety of yesterday, or even before: the medieval woodcut or again the 
Dreams and Lies of Franco by Pablo Picasso, the father of us all. An ad- 
mission which should only make orphans sneer! 




z8 



I came across some drawings and etchings of mine, done in 195 1 (in 
Brussels) and 1952 (in Paris), which seem to anticipate a sequential ar- 
rangement of images. But how could I have foreseen the Unfolded 
Newspapers (see cat. nos. 3-6, 8), very much like the marginalia of Cen- 
tral Park, a painting begun in New York after having discovered the 
Park from the thirtieth floor, and seen the paths, rocks and lawns turn, 
before my eyes, into the maw of a debonaire monster devouring yellow 
cabs and pedestrians. "Don't cross Central Park at night?" As we 
know! The painting, begun in New York, was finally completed in the 
country, on the border of Normandy. 

Frame by frame .... In Death and the Maiden, 1967 (cat. no. 12), I 
built a sequence of frames like those of an animated cartoon (the pre- 
della was an ancestor of the cartoon: the painter showed several scenes 
or events connected with the main subject). In Circling the Matter (cat. 
no. 13), done the same year, or in Past Unnoticed, 1981 (cat. no. 50), I 
reproduced in the margins some details that appear in the center, details 
that were enigmatic because of their very singularity. A repetition, with 
amplifications, turns a singular image into a recognizable form. The 
image calls for its double. 

First the center was in color and the remarks generally in black and 
white. Later on I reversed the process. The center would be in black and 
white, in India ink, the margins in color. There were no more separate 
frames but a single runway without visible beginning or end. This 
changes the habits of composition. 

M.G.: As in The Sphinx's Repressed Laughter of 1982 
(cat. no. 53). The margins are done on paper sub- 
sequently mounted on canvas. Do you always use the 
same material? 

P.A.: I vary the supports. In addition to paper from China, Japan, 
Taiwan or Korea, I also use pages recovered from record books of past 
centuries — accountant's sheets, notarized documents, old bills — Rus- 
sian bonds, obsolete aerial navigation maps, etc., which calls to mind 
the principle of the palimpsest. This recycling of old material gives me 
the chance to find something touching: in the discovery of the everyday 
preoccupations of a bygone age, preoccupations so similar to our own. 



2-9 



M.e..: We were discussing the interpretation of a painting 
a while ago and you mentioned the "ventriloquist's 
dummy." Does this metaphor imply that one should not 
listen to what the dummy has to say? 

P.A.: The definitions we add to an indefinite, indefinable yet to be de- 
fined or already (momentarily) more or less identified image are derived 
from daydreams, and each of us does not dream m the same way every 
tune. You cannot bathe twice in the same image. Rather, it is the bather 
who changes — but let's not go into that. 

There is a tree, a quasi-landscape. Great lava flows, a mask in profile, a 
torso wrapped in bandages. Have I sufficiently respected, sufficiently 
clarified the intent of the line? Working in the labyrinth, I clutched the 
thread which (as 1 perceived it) would lead me to the plausible dome of 
a skull, or a slow spilling over of lava or of molten iron. Walkway is the 
title that occurred to me after having finished the border of a painting 
that reminded me of a suspended walkway. This refers to a twofold 
reminiscence: one, a visit to the Pont-a-Mousson Foundry in Lorraine, 
and two, the viewing of Fellini's E la nave va. Micky and I had been to a 
dinner party and there we stood, both of us rather ridiculously over- 
dressed, on the walkway beside a foundry Director in a double-breasted 
suit, like the tourists in the movie looking down on the engine room — 
on the inferno. (I had gone to Pont-a-Mousson in the hopes of finding 
some nineteenth-century manhole covers, but in a foundry every scrap 
of metal is melted down again.) This is merely intended to suggest 
where a painting's title may be found, and by what devious ways. 
Another day, I might only have distinguished a tree: Tree or Walkway, 
one or the other can nonetheless impel one to say: "What do you know, 
a myth!" 

Bougival-Paris, September 1986 




Bougival, 






■3Pm 




Works in the Exhibition 



Unless otherwise noted, marginal drawings surround the central image on four sides. 

4^ <^?<^/L<.tzZ5£isc£z> 




33 




Detail, marginal drawing for Central Park 



M 



Central Park, j 965 

Acrylic with marginal drawings in India ink on paper mounted on 1 

6} 3 Ax 76" (162 x 193 cm) 

Collection of the artist 











Detail, marginal drawing for Central Park 



36 



z. All in One Breath {he tout venant). 1966 

India ink on paper, 2.4V2 x 35V2' (62.5 x 90 cm) 

Collection Musee National d'Art Moderne, Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris. Gift of the artist 







37 



Unfolded Newspaper {Journal dephe). i960 

India ink and wax crayon on paper, 24 x 55'/;" (62 x 90 cm) 

Collection Jerome and Marlene Brody 

Unfolded Newspaper (Journal deplie). 1966 
India ink on paper, 2.4 ■'/« x 35 'At. " (62 x 89 cm) 
Private Collection 




38 



5. Unfolded Newspaper (Journal deplie). 1966 
India ink on paper, 2.4 Vs x 35V16 " (62. x 89 cm) 
Private Collection 

6. Unfolded Newspaper (Journal deplie). 1966 
India ink on paper, 18 'A x 34W (46 x 88 cm) 
Private Collection 














9 



39 



After Malevich (Apres Malevitch). 1966 

Acrylic with marginal drawings in India ink on paper mounted on canvas, 

55V2X 54" (141 x 137 cm) 

Collection Stephane Janssen, Beverly Hills 



pis Jllypl 

glpia 



SITO! 







*2 ©i - 



"$ 



P 



Unfolded Newspaper (Journal deplie). 1967 
India ink on paper, i3 3 /s x 24" (34 x 61 cm) 
Collection of the artist 




41 



Under Hire (Sous le feu). 1967 

Acrylic with predella drawings in India ink on paper mounted on canvas, 

95 \ j8 3 A" (114 x 199 cm) 

l ollection Musee National d'Art Moderne, Centre Cieorges Pompidou, Pans. Purchase of the State 








¥0M'K 



vanJmmm 



io. Drastic Cut (Coupe sombre). 1967 

Acrylic with marginal drawings at left and right in India ink on paper mounted 1 
39 3 /s x 96" (100 x 244 cm) 
Collection Museum Ludwig, Cologne 














i ABornMother Fibre maternelle). 1967 
Acrylic with marginal drawings in India ink on paper mounted on canvas 
63V1X $i s "(i6ix 130cm) 
Collection Mr. and Mrs. Melvin A. Golder 



mm 






i-sfjBjaef^', 







[ z. Death and the Maiden (La jenne fille et la mort). 1967 

Acrylic with marginal drawings in India ink on paper mounted on canvas, 
54 x 54" (137 x 137 cm) 
Collection Marion Lefebre 




45 



5 ( 'tiding the Matter (he tour de sujet). 1967-68 

Acrylic on paper mounted on canvas with marginal drawings in India ink on paper 
mounted on wood, 8z 3 Ax 142." (2.10 x 360 cm) 
I'm iii 1. ollection, France 




46 




mm: ' 






im 




[_t Sources of Information (Sources d' information). 1968 
Ink on paper, 38V* x z6 5 /s" (98 x 66.7 cm) 
Private Collection 




4 X 



[5. Sources of Information (Sources d' information) . 
Ink on paper, 38V8 x 2.6%" (98 x 66.7 cm) 
Private Collection 



l6. Sources of Information (Sources J' 111 formation). 15 
Ink on paper, 38VS x z6 5 /s" (98 x 66.7 cm) 
Private Collection 





49 



[7 Sources of Information (Son 
Ink on paper, 38% x 26 V»" ( 
Private Collection 



[8. Sources of Information (Sources a" information). 
Ink on paper, 38V8 x z6 s /s" (98 x 66.7 cm) 
Private Collection 





SO 



[9 Star and Disaster (Astre et desastre). 1969 

Acrylic with predella drawings in India ink on silver paper mounted on canvas, 
61 x 61" (155 x t55 cm) 
Collection Baroness Van Zuylen 




51 



z.0. Agoraphobia Square (Le carre des agoraphobes). 1966 and 1970 

Oil on canvas (1966) with marginal drawings in India ink and acrylic mounted on paper 
mounted on wood (1970), 54 x 55'/:" (137 x 141 cm) 
Collection Joyce and Samir Mansour, Paris 




5 2 



2i. Tooth and Nail (Toutes griffes dehors). 1970 

Acrylic with predella drawings in India ink on paper mounted on canvas, 

72% x 90%" (184x230 cm) 

Collection Nordjyllands Kunstmuseum, Aalborg, Denmark 




53 



Gone Up in Smoke (Parti en fumeej. 19- 1 

Acrylic with marginal drawings in India ink on paper mounted on canvas, 
53V2X 54" (136 x 137 cm) 
Collection Pierre Hebey 




5 A 



•-3. So Many Windows (Autant de fenetres). 1971 

Watercolor on paper mounted on canvas, ii5 3 /4 x 156" (2.94 x 396 em) 
Collection of the artist 




' 1 ' ' '"WXn 









W0Wmw 







iv -' - • .. 




l 4 Boreality Borealite). m-i 

Acrylic with marginal drawings in watercolor on paper mounted on canvas, 54 x ft 1 ' ' \„" (137 x r 57 cm) 

C ollectum Guy Georges, Paris 







> , 













. 


'■'■'^\h ^^h, 




3«aE 


> a. 



56 



-5- Aztec Volcano (Volcan azteque). 1971 

Acrylic with marginal drawings in watercolor on paper mounted on canvas, 

61V4 x 79V2" (155.6 x zoz cm) 

Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice. Gift, Enrico and Fiorella Chian, Venice, 19.S4 

84-3*53 




57 



i6 Bird's-Eye View (Tour d' horizon). 1971 

India ink on paper mounted on canvas with marginal drawings in India ink and acr 

on old manuscripts, iuS'kx 153 V2" (300 x 390 cm) 

Collection The Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh; The Henry L. Hillman Fund, 




58 



27. Delft Blue (Le bleu de Delft). 1972 
Acrylic with predella drawings in v 
■/S 3 A x ri8Vs" (200 x 300 cm) 
Private Collection; on loan to Loui 



color on paper mounted on canvas, 

1 Museum of Modern Art, Humlebaek, Denmark 




5") 



iS Scj Sickness (i\Lil Jc mer). 19-2 

India ink on paper mounted on canvas, 59 1 /: x 39" (151 x 99 1 
(. iilkxtiiin ot the artist 




60 



19 The Blue Tree (L'arbre bleu). 197^1 

Acrylic with acrylic predella on paper mounted on canvas, 71 x 61" (180 x 154 cm) 
Collection Michel Fribourg, New York 




6l 



}o Redeemed Share (Action de jonissance). 1975 

Acrylic on paper mounted on canvas with marginal drawings in Indi 
94V2 x iog'/x" (204 x 277 cm) 
Collection Lens Fine Art, Antwerp 



documents, 








s^^k 


,• . 


<r ;~, ; 


si 


Ikil 


mEt- 






Ou 


BctI ^ 




^ 


3 
/ ** 






3i. Come from Afar {Menu de loin). 1975 

Acrylic with predeila drawings in India ink on paper mounted on canvas, 
78 3 /4 x nS'/s" (zoo x 300 cm) 
Collection of the artist 




63 



j2 The Sound of the Fall (Le bruit de la chute). 1975 

Acrylic with predella drawings 111 India ink on paper mounted on canvas, 

59 x 60 1 4" (151 x 1 53 cm) 

( ollection Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humlebaek, Denmark 




64 



33- Bouches du Rhone Suite (Suite des Bouches du Rhone). 
India ink on paper, 84V4 x 36V4" (215 x 92 cm) 
Private Collection 



34. Bouches du Rhone Suite (Suite des Bouches du Rhone). 
India ink on paper, 84% x 36V4' (215 x 92 cm) 
Private Collection 





65 



35 Bouches du Rhone Suite (Suite des Bouches du Rhone). 1976 
India ink on paper, 84 'A x 36 l A" (2.1 5 x 91 cm) 
Private Collection 



Bouches du Rhone Suite (Suite des Bouches du Rhone). 1976 
India ink on paper, 84V4 x 36V4" (215 x 92 cm) 
Private Collection 





L ,J? 




37- Bouches du Rhone Suite (Suite des Bouches du Rhone). 1976 
India ink on paper, 84V4 x 36V4" (215 x 92 cm) 
Private Collection 











L^f±^£ 



67 



Abrupt Falile (Abrupte fable). 1976 

India ink and acrylic on paper mounted on canvas folding screen with logogram 

by Christian Dotremont, iii 3 /» x 187" (284 x 475 cm) 

(. ol lection of the artist 




5^7 



w 






68 




abrupte fable 

d'etre d'herbe de verbe de sable de flots 

a serpentements d'orage 

tendre de fruit 

a cheminements presque terrestres 

a traces de presque pas 

a presque rien d'avant 

a developpements 

en roue d'oiseau-lyre 

a brusquement voter 

de nuances ensemble 

a la nuit d'un nuage 

dore jusqu'au soleil 

a depliures de cri 

a bruissements de jour 

a regards de chant 

abrupt fable 

of being of grass of words of sand of wave 

of snakestorms 

delicacy of fruit 

pathways almost terrestrial 

footprints of almost not 

almost nothing of before 

developments 

fanned-out lyrebird style 

suddenly flying 

light and shade together 

by cloudnight 

golden through to sun 

with cry's un foldings 

with day's rustlings 

with the gaze of song 



(Translated by Michael Fineberg) 



6 9 



39. Fall (Chute). 1977 

Acrylic with acrylic border on paper mounted on canvas, 41 x 25 ', 
Private Collection, Paris 




40. Sky Square (Carre de ciel). 1978 

Acrylic with predella drawings in India ink on paper mounted on canvas, 44V2 x 39V2" (113 x 100 cm) 
C oik-ction Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Mindhn 




Depict, Describe (Depeindre, decrire). 1979 

Acrylic on paper mounted on canvas with acrylic marginalia on old manuscripts, 

59 x 78 3 /»" ( 1 50 x 2.00 cm) 

Private Collection 




73 



/ Am /.;; (Jc suis loin). 1979 

Acrylic with acrylic predella on paper mounted on canvas, 50 x 36W (1 27 x 92 cm) 

Private Collection 




43- In Octavo. 1979 

Acrylic on paper mounted on canvas, 25V2 x 38" (65 x 96.5 cm) 
Collection Marion Lefehre 




75 



44 Bedtime (Coucher). 1980 

Acrylic with acrylic marginalia on paper mounted 1 
Collection Meridian Partners, Inc., New York 



5,36x43 (90 x110 cm) 




76 



f5 Awaking (Reveil). 1980 

Acrylic with acrylic marginalia on paper mounted on canvas, 36 x 43" (90 x no cm) 
Collection Meridian Partners, Inc., New York 




46 After Us (Apres nous). [980 

Acrylic with marginal drawings in India ink on paper mounted on canvas, 
61 x 88'/2" (155 x 22s cm) 
Collection of the artist 





-■V 



78 



47- Legible Athens (Athenes en lecture). 1980 

India ink on map mounted on canvas with acrylic predella on paper, 55V2 x 87" (141 x 111 cm) 
Collection of the artist 




4 8 Codex. 1 98 1 
Acrylic with ac 
Collection Sole 

85 ?i8o 



ic border on paper mounted on canvas, 60V2 x 118" (153.5 x 3°° cm ) 
on R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. Gift, Mr. Jerome Brody, 1985 




80 



%<). Unlimited Responsibility (Responsabilite illimitee). 1981 

Acrylic on paper mounted on canvas with predella drawings in India ink on documents, 
6o 5 /s x 6o 5 /s" (154 x 154 cm) 
Courtesy Galerie Maeght Lelong, Paris 




50. Past Unnoticed (Le passe inapercu). 1981 

Acrylic with marginal drawings in India ink on paper mounted on canvas, 

102 Vs x 185" (zo6 x 470 cm) 

Collection Mr. and Mrs. N. Richard Miller 





§3 



The Break (La faille . 198] 

\^r\ Ik (in paper mounted on canvas with marginal drawings in India ink on maps 

- i i x 94' z" (185 x 140 cm) 

Collection The State Museums of the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg 




84 



52. A Taste of the Abyss (Le gout de gouffre). 1980-82 

Acrylic with border drawings in India ink on paper mounted on canvas, 
60V4 x 94V2" (153 x 240 cm) 
Collection of the artist 




85 



5 3 The Sphinx 's Repressed Laughter (Le reprime ricanement du Sphinx) .1982 

India ink with acrylic border on paper mounted on canvas, 73 l A x 1 11'A" (186 x 286 cm) 
Collection of the artist 




86 



54- The Dog King (Le chien rot). 1982 

India ink with acrylic border on paper mounted on canvas, 81V2 x 81V2" (207 x 207 cm) 
Collection of the artist 




87 



55 Exquisite Words (Mots exquis). 1981 

India ink on map with predella drawings in India ink on paper, 52 
Collection General-Ma|or Aviateur P. de Groof, Brussels 



51V2" (134 x 131 cm) 




56. Icy Eye f( )eil de glace). 1982 

India ink with marginal drawings in India ink on map, 42 7 /s x 57V2" (109 x 146 cm) 
Courtesy Galerie Maeght Lelong, Paris 








^ 




pp. 90-91 57. Geographic Theater (Theatre gcographiquc). 1983 

Acrylic and India ink with marginal drawings in acrylic and India ink on map, 
10- x 191 VV (2.72 x 487 cm) 
Private Collection 




58. Gust of Wind (Bourrasque). 1981-83 

India ink with acrylic border on paper mounted on canvas, io9 7 /s x 193V4" (279 x 492 cm) 
Private Collection 




93 



59 Three-Leaf Clover (Trifle a trots feuilles). 1983 

India ink with acrylic border mounted on canvas, 39 Vs x 59" (100 x 1 50 cm) 
Private Collection 




94 



6o. Power of the Tree (Jeu d'arbre). 1983 

India ink on paper mounted on canvas with acrylic marginali, 

71V4 x 87" (182 x zzi cm) 

Courtesy Galene Maeght Lelong, Paris 



i paper mounted on wood, 




95 



(M Clearing (Clairien 
India ink with acr 

Collection Norm.! 



tier on paper moun 
i m.i Br; iiii.ni 



70 7 /s x i i - ! 4" ( 1 So x 3 50 cm) 




96 



62 BnJgchi\hl : I etc Jc punt). 1983 

India ink and acrylic with acrylic border on map mounted on canvas, 

15V2X 40V2" (65 x 103 cm) 

Collection Mr. and Mrs. Michel David-Weill, New York 




6}. Surprise Journey (Voyage surprise). 1983 

Acrylic on map with acrylic predella on paper, 36Y8 x 35V2" (93 x 90 cm) 
Collection J. P. Ledeur, Paris 




99 



64 Cardinal Forest (Foret cardinale). 1981-84 

Acrylic with marginal drawings in India ink on paper mounted on canvas, 
34V16X 73 1 /4"(8 7 x 186 cm) 
Private Collection 




65. Little Snail (Petit escargot). 1984 

India ink with acrylic border on paper mounted on canvas, 
98 3 A x 137V4" (250 x 350 cm) 
Courtesy Galerie Maeght Lelong, Paris 







66 Occupied Window (Fenetre occupee). i 
India ink w ith acrylic border on paper i 
21 ' -. \ I- 1 j" s4 \ 44 cm 
Private Collection 



Green Cold (Or vert). 1984 
India ink with acrylic horde 
2.C 8 x 20" (60 x 51 cm) 
Private C ollection 



paper mounted on canvas, 



68 ( )rifice. 1984 

India ink with acrylic border on paper mounted on canvas, 
23 Vs x 20" (60 x 5 1 cm) 
Private Collection 

69 Later (Plus tard). 1984 

India ink with acrylic border on paper mounted on canvas, 
21 'a x 1- 1 4" (54 x 44 cm) 
Private Collection 

70. Mineral Victory (Victoire minerale). 1984 

India ink with acrylic border on paper mounted on canvas, 
23 s /s x 20" (60 x 5 1 cm) 
Private Collection 

71. Wheel of Earth and of Shadow (Roue de terre et d'ombre). 1984 
India ink with acrylic border on paper mounted on canvas, 

23 Vs x 20" (60 x 51 cm) 
Private Collection 






ig^-~***msm* 





AM ii^ 






103 



7 i Principal Wheel (Roue principal) . 1984 

India ink with acrylic border on paper mounted on < 
61V16 x 45" 1.," (1 56 x 116 cm) 
Collection Michel Guy, Pans 




104 



73. On the Porch (Sur le perron). 1984 
India ink with acrylic border on papei 
Private Collection 



;d on canvas, 39 3 /s x 39 3 /s" (100 x 100 cm) 




105 



-4 Fireflies (Lueitiles). 1984 

India ink with acrylic border on paper mounted on canvas, ji'/x 
Courtesy Galene Birch, Copenhagen 



14WU85 x 284 cm) 




106 



75- Chromatic Buoy (Bouee chromatique). 1984 

Acrylic and India ink with rubbing and acrylic border on paper mounted on canvas, 
79 x 79" (200 x 200 cm) 
Collection of the artist 




107 



-(> Quadrillage. i M.S4 

India ink with rubbing and acrylic border on paper mounted on canva 
74 13 /i6 x 38'/V (190 x 97 cm) 
Private Collection 




77- Box and Skull (Boite et crane). 1985 

India ink with acrylic border on paper mounted on canvas, 37V4 x 41V16" (95 x 105 cm) 
Collection Mr. and Mrs. Melvin A. Colder 




£S 



109 



78. The Forgotten Wool (La Lime oubliee). 1978-85 

Acrylic with acrylic border on paper mounted on canvas, 
85 x ^ 6 '■ 4 " (216 X 92 cm) 
Private Collection 




79- Blue Criterion (Critere bleu). 1978-85 

Acrylic on paper mounted on canvas with marginal drawings in India ink on paper 
mounted on wood, 81 x 59%" (268 x 152 cm) 
Private Collection 




8o. Soles' Rose Window (Rosace des semelles). 1985 

India ink with rubbing and acrylic border in India ink on 
paper mounted on canvas, 74 1 Vit. x 38 Vk," (190 x 97 cm) 



Street Pepper d'nwre des rues). 1985 
India ink with rubbing and acrylic border on paper 
mounted on canvas, 74 "/if, x 3 8 Vi f," {190 x 97 cm) 
Courtesy Galerie Maeght Lelong, Paris 





Jz. Mill Wheel (Meule). 1985 

Acrylic and India ink on paper w 
io6 5 /i 6 x 114'/)" (270 x 290 cm) 
Private Collection 



th rubbing and prcdella drawings in India ink on paper, 




113 



;•, Stirring Water (Remuement d'eau). 19S5 

Acrylic and India ink with rubbing and acrylic border on paper mounted on canvas, 

78% \ -S'V (200 x 200 cm) 

Collection Mr. and Mrs. J. Karel P. van Stuijvenberg, Caracas 




84. The End of the Tunnel (he bout de tunnel). 1986 

India ink with acrylic border on paper mounted on canvas, 37V2 x 37V2" (95 x 95 cm) 
Collection Jacques Putman, Paris 







**&~^u0P*'*4>> ****** 



115 



85 Harpsichord {Clavecin). 198ft 

Manufactured by Von Nagel, Paris, 1 986 

In collaboration with Jm Kolaf: outside of lid, stand base, music st; 
India ink and acrylic on paper mounted on harpsichord, 32I/2 x 93 \ 
Collection ot the artist 



id, lid prop 

x 36"/,." (81.5 




Il6 



86 The Days Are Getting Longer (Les jours rallongent). 1986 

Acrylic with marginal drawings in India ink on paper mounted on canvas, 106V4 x i96 7 /s" (270 x 500 cm) 
Courtesy Galerie Maeght Lelong, Pans 




Vocabulary (Vocabulaire). 1986 

Temporary decorations for 4 Guggenheim Museum eleva 

acrylic on paper mounted on canvas, 8 vertical elements, each 1 10 

4 lintels, each 32."/i6 x 74" (83 x 188 cm) 





mm wm 





I2 3 



p f jmmmmm ; ? ^mmm 



i^rm 



fjAffll 



if SI 




In print shop, Paris, during production 
of Ting's It Life, 1964 



125 



PRINTS 



126 



Roots {Racines). 1952 

From Hayterophilies, 1952—53, album containing 1 1 etchings 

Etching, i4 7 /s x zi7s" (37.7 x 55.7 cm) 

9/30 

Collection Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. Anonymous Gift 

86.3345.2 




127 



89 The* at's Walk Promenade du chat). 1961 
Etching, [2x13 io.5 x 33.5 cm 

S JO 

Collection Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. Gift of the , 

86 5346 




128 



90. Remarks Renuraues). 1960—63 

Lithograph, 19% x 14W (50 x 36 cm) 

55^5 

Collection Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. Anonymous Gift 

86.3350 




91 Exprmntl Film. 1967 

Lithograph, 3 1 *A x Z3 W (80.5 x 59 cm) 

Collection Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. Anonymous Gift 
86 5356 




filmexprmntlfilm 
CASINO KNOKKE 

25X11-1967 2-1-1968 
02.13.41.55 050.614.71 




92. Mrs. Felicity Milici (Madame Mtlici Felicite). 1971 
Lithograph, 2.$Vi x 19" (65.5 x 48. 2. cm) 
3/15 

Collection Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. Anonymous Gift 
86.3367 




93- Seismographic Armful (Brassee sismographique). 1971 

Lithograph with logogram by Christian Dotremont, 33V2 x 14 Vis" (85.1 x 61 1 cm) 
Collection Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. Anonymous Gift 

86 3370 




brassee sismographique de gouffre 

au fur et a demesure de nuit 

a caresses de cohere d'encre 

a va-et-vient de caprices de montee 

stnante de roche 

de stratigraphie de souffles 

vers le haut d'astres 

de matin brusquement cree reel 

mais de toutes progressions de toutes couleurs 

survenantes de toutes formes soulevees 
de source encore se demultipliant de surgir 
abruptement mats de'ja vers le jour sc multipliant de vivt 
de visage en vision 

de soleil en perle de serpentement en fete 
de nature d'herbe en gerbe de volcan 
en roseaux jusqu'a I'ocean si pimpant d'un ciel 
en elancement de terre jusqu'au cri si vivace d'un arbre 
et deja pourtant menace d'une forme de mort 
que la vie meme refuse 
par une nuit nouvelle 
vers le haut du meme gouffre 
non moins peuple de fables 
vivaces a meme tout desespoir de source 

de condition de vivre et quotidiennement revivre 
vers le matin revenant reel cree 
vers le premier cri a resurgir 
a meme toutes formes et toutes couleurs 
si ardentes toujours 
qu'elles nous jettent a devenir 



seismographic armful of emptiness 
nightwise nightcrazy as and when 
with caresses of ink and anger 
come and go go as you flow upward 
streaking rockpath 
of breath stratigraphy 
upward and starward 
into morning created suddenly there 
but from all progressions all colors 

arising from all forms arisen 
from origin still gearing down from surging 
abruptly but already toward the day gearing up from living 
from face to vision 

from sun to pearl snakeloops to celebration 
grass nature to volcanic sheaf 

in reeds all the way to the ocean so spick and span from a sky 
soaring up from earth all the way to a tree's cry 
perennial and yet already threatened by a form of death 
that life itself rejects 
by a new night 

to the highest reach of the same emptiness 
no less peopled with fables 
hardy m the midst of despair of origin of condition 

of living daily reliving 
toward the morning created returning real 
toward the first cry to arise 
in the midst of all forms all colors 
so ardent still 
they launch us into becoming 



(Translated by Michael Fineherg) 



g4 Mud Soiree Soiree Mini). 19-4 

Occasioned by Mini's Sotli birthday celebration, 

given by Anne Maeght, Pans 

Lithographic print on cheesecloth, i6'sx 1 6 ' 2" (4 1 X41C 

Collection Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. 

Anonymous Gift 

86 5374 



95. Exprmntl Film. 1974 

( )ngmal offset print, ii'.sx n 1 / (-9 x s9 cm) 
Collection Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. 
Anonymous Gift 
86.3375 





134 



96. Direct Line (Ligne directe). 1976 
Etching, 20 3 /s x 30" (51.8 x 76.2 cm) 
9/12 

Collection Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. Anonymous Gift 
86.3383 




135 



i)- Aijii.: Fortis (L'eau forte). [976 
Etching, 14 ; 4 \ %-" (62 S \ 94 cm) 
Artist's proof, 9 1 1 

Collection Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. Gift of the artist 
86.3384 




I 3 6 



98. Watchman's Path (Chemin de ronde). 1977 

Linocut and lithograph, 24' Vk, x }6'/i" (63 x 92.7 cm) 

137/150 

Collection Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. Anonymous Gift 

86.3387 




137 



Recycled Papers (Papiers traites). 1978 

Paper folder containing title page and 6 lithographs 

Folder, z6 3 A x 2.0 'V (68 x 52.. 4 cm); title page and lithographs, each 2.6' x x xd'ht" (67 x 52 cm) 

56/99 

Collection Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. Anonymous Gift 

86 .3389.1-. 8 



»HA»*»»%%fc% %%»%**»« 



L 



TtAitfs 



.AA<f Cr«T h\T<;\\L 



/>AlW : 



TtfAifti 



\ ; J A/ 5 /r % Rj rfK'u*$< T>{*iTt?s 



KAfVpafr, A I'/MtoWK'i? J 

(Ui\ itiAiASiK f (HF0<frfJ , 
/Alii J >}16 A* iVWtf<? Bt J 



3 /Aril I 





138 



fUt ijaAMA ******** ^u m» %«g 

3 M!^j»T^y^^^ 





* * www vrtm* tmr 



r»ji »j*j%j»j»*%>*%*%AA*fc 



1 




5 5 

i 39 




ioo Around the Falls (Autour des chutes), i 979 

Etching and pochoir, 13 Vs x 58 3 /<t" (59.4 x 98.4 cm) 



Collection Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. Gift of the ar 
86 539] 




m&m&Kj 



[40 



ioi. Square by Square (Case par case). 1980 
Etching, 67V4 x }6" (170x91.4 cm) 
28/35 

Collection Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. Gift of the 
86.3393 




ioz Scrambled Ephemerides (I phemerides brouillees). 198c 
Etching, 73 1 4 \ 36V2" (186 1 x 91 8 cm) 



Collection Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. Gift of the artist 
86.3394 




© 



^^F^^^^W^^ITT^i 




103. With Michel Portal (Avec Michel Portal). 1980 
Lithograph, 14V16 x 12%" (36.7 x 32.5 cm) 
9/10 

Collection Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. 
Anonymous Gift 
86.3396 



104. Predator (Predateur). 1982 

Lithograph and etching, 3 6 Vk x 25 Vz" (917 x647 cm) 

105/120 

Collection Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. 

Anonymous Gift 

86.3398 





V' V v v v^V 



J 43 



105. Jazz. [984 

Lithograph, 59 ' -1 x 39 ' V ( 1 54 x 99 7 cm) 

14/50 

Collection Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. Anonymous Gift 

86 3399 




io6. Water (Eau). 1981—85 

Color lithograph, Z9 3 /s x 2i 5 /s" (74.2 x 55 cm) 

Presentation proof, 1/150 

Collection Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. Complete edition, Gift in honor of the artist 

84.3439 




145 



Water to the Skylight (L'eau a la lucarne). 1985 

Lithograph, 63 x 47' V (160 x 1198 cm) 

24/16 

Collection Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. Gift of the ai 

86.3403 




46 



Wheel of Writing (Roue d'ecriture). 1985 

In collaboration with Michel Butor: facsimile of manuscript 

Etching and pochoir with stamp cancelled with date of first issue, z6 x 19V4" [66 x 50 cm) 

70/90 

Collection Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. Anonymous Gift 

86.3402 



"1 



Ir 




J 



147 




Noel Arnaud, Alechinsky, Jorn, Ezio 
Gribaudo and printers, printshop, 
Fratelli Pozzo, Turin, 1968 



CHRONOLOGY 



Superieure d'Architecture et des 
els; studies book illus- 



1927 

Born October 19 in Brussels to a Russian naturalized 
Belgian father and a Walloon mother. Both parents were 
doctors. 

1944 

Enters Ecole N 

Arts Decoratifs, La Camb: 

tration and typography. 

1946 

Reads and wanders. 
First attempts at oil painting. 

Attends first Carnaval de Binche, held in Hainaut, Bel- 
gium, since World War II; he later draws inspiration 
from this popular festival. 

1947 

Joins Jeune Peinture Beige group. 

First one-man exhibition in Brussels, at Galerie Lou Cosyn 

First etchings. 

Trips to Morocco and Yugoslavia. 

1948 

Meets Michele Dendal (Micky). 

First lithographs. 

Stay in Pans. 

1949 

Meets Christian Dotremont in March in Brussels and 

joins the group Cobra (COpenhagen-BRussels-Amster- 

dam). With sculptors Olivier Strebelle and Reinhoud 

and graphic artist Michel Olyff establishes a community 

house, Les Ateliers du Marais, which becomes Centre de 

Recherche Cobra. Through this center will pass Karel 

Appel, Atlan, Pol Bury, Hugo Claus, Constant, Cor- 

neille, Jan Cox, Oscar Dominguez, Peggy Guggenheim, 

Edouard Jaguer, Asger Jorn, Willem Sandberg, Raoul 

Ubac, Curt Valentin and others. 

Marries Micky. 

1950 

Helene Jacquet Prize, La Louviere, Belgium. 

Jeune Peinture Beige Prize (ex-aequo). 

Lithographs for Derriere le Miroir, no. 32, Maeght, Paris. 

Cobra moves: Appel and Corneille leave Amsterdam for 

Paris; Jorn leaves Copenhagen for Suresnes near Paris. 

Trip to Scandinavia. 




Pierre and Micky Alechinsky, Dotre- 
mont, Corneille and Doucet, Cobra 
exhibition, Stedeh|k Museum, Amste 
dam, 1949 



149 



1951 

Dotremont and Jorn are hospitalized in Denmark for 
pulmonary tuberculosis. 

Organizes last Cobra exhibition, at Palais des Beaux- 
Arts, Liege, and publishes "Abstraction faite" in tenth 
and final issue of review Cobra. 
Cobra movement dissolves. 
Receives French Government scholarship. 
Leaves Brussels to settle in Paris. 
1952 

Studies engraving with Stanley William Hayter at Atelier 
17, Paris. 

Corresponds with calligrapher Shiryu Morita, director 
of review Bokubi (The Beauty of Ink) in Kyoto. Fre- 
quently visits studio of Alberto Giacometti, whom he 
has known since 1950. Art writer Jacques Putman, a 
longtime friend, introduces him to Bram van Velde. 
Draws from nature at Tourettes-sur-Loup (Alpes- 
Mantimes): bamboo roots, branches and pebbles. 
Birth of Ivan. 



Joins organizing committee of Salon Octobre, Paris, which 
includes Charles Estienne, Jean Messagier and others. 
Jaguer entrusts him with technical direction of first issue 
of Phases. 

Draws "the writings of the tide" at Nieuport, Belgium. 
With American sculptor Shinkichi Tajiri shows at 
Kunsthandel Martinet, Amsterdam; catalogue preface 
by Dotremont: L'arbre el I'arme. 



1954 

First one-man exhibition in Paris, at Galene Nina Daus- 
set: Victor Brauner, Michel Butor, Max Ernst, Sam 
Francis, Jacques Herold, Matta, Henri Michaux and 
Jean Paulhan attend; catalogue preface by Dotremont: 
"Language gets bogged down in Assemblies, colors in 
Schools, but the poet speaks the pure meaning, and so 
does the painter; I am thinking of Alechinsky. There is 
something quite rare about this guy. He does not believe 
that painting is any closer to life if it moves away from 
painting itself." 

Writes "Au-dela de l'ecriture" for Phases, no. z. 
Meets Walasse Ting, who urges him to visit the Far East. 
Paints Ant Hill, which James Johnson Sweeney will ac- 
quire for Guggenheim Museum in 1957. 

1955 

Jorn, who is resettling in Paris, stays with him. 

Embarks for Japan with Micky in September: Marseille, 
Port-Said, Djibouti, Colombo, Singapore, Saigon, Ma- 
nila, Hong Kong, Yokohama. 




With Micky and cameraman Franci 
Haar, Kyoto, 1955 



150 



1956 

Dotremont organizes first "Cobra after Cobra" exhibi- 
tion, at Galerie Taptoe, Brussels. 

Opening of his film Calligraphie japonaise with Morita 
and Toko Shinoda, shot the preceding year in Tokyo 
and Kyoto (text by Dotremont, narrated by Roger Bhn, 
music by Andre Souris and produced by Pierre Braun- 
berger). 

1957 

Special Citation for Calligraphie japonaise at Interna- 
tional Festival of Art Films, Bergamo, Italy. 
At Henri Langlois's request, executes mural for Cine- 
matheque francaise, Paris. 

First large inks on crumpled paper mounted on canvas. 
Collaborates on Andre Balthazar's and Pol Bury's re- 
view Daily Bui (La Louviere). 

1958 

Becomes member of organizing committee of Salon de 
Mai, Paris. 

Joins Galerie de France, Paris, directed by Gildo Caputo 
and Myriam Prevot-Douatte. 
Birth of Nicolas. 
1959 

Sam Hunter includes him, together with Corneille, 
Cesar, Eduardo Chillida, Alan Davie, Jean Degottex, 
Roel D'Haese, Jorn, Robert Miiller, Antonio Saura and 
Antoni Tapies, in European Art Today, at The Min- 
neapolis Institute of Arts. 

At invitation of Jorn and Paolo Marinotti participates in 
Vitalita nell'arte at Palazzo Grassi, Venice. Paints large 
canvases, including Vanish, gift of Julian and Jean Aber- 
bach to Guggenheim Museum in 1967. 

1960 

Hallmark Prize, New York, for his painting Homage to 

Ensor, i960. 

John Lefebre opens a gallery in New York and shows 

Cobra i<)6o. 

Installs and shares studios with Reinhoud in former vil- 
lage school in La Bosse (Oise), France. 

Draws after nature: orange peels (see Guggenheim In- 
ternational Award, exh. cat., New York, 1964, pp. 98, 100). 

1961 

Citation of Honor for Calligraphic japonaise at Cultural 
Film Festival, Tokyo. 

First trip to New York. He works in the Chelsea Hotel, 
later in Walasse Ting's studio. 



Alechinsky, Davie, C. H. Pedersen and David Smith are 

given one-man exhibitions at Pittsburgh International, 

Carnegie Institute. 

Les tireurs de langue: title and illustrations for short 

stones of Amos Kenan, and paintings, drawings and 

prints on the theme. 

First one-man exhibition in a museum, Stedehjk 

Museum, Amsterdam; catalogue preface by Putman: 

"Aggressively. Because to be aggressive is to be absent, 

and to be absent is to feel; and to feel is...." 

First one-man exhibition in Munich, at Galerie van de Loo. 

1962 

First one-man exhibition in New York, at Lefebre Gallery. 

With Dotremont, series of "drawing-words." With Ting, 

the Alechings, "paintings for four hands." 

Sends several pages on lost calligraphy to Paulhan, who 

publishes them in La Nouvelle Revue Francaise (N.R.F., 

no. 119). 

1963 

Andre Breton visits his studio. He had written to him 

earlier: "That which I savor most in art is that which 

you command, that power to entwine curves, that 

clearly organic rhythm, that happy feminine submission 

which you obtain from color, from light." 

He and Jorn exchange work; Jorn donates prints, ink 

drawings and paintings he obtains to his Silkeborg 

Museum, Denmark. 

Meets Joyce Mansour, many of whose books and poems 

he will illustrate: Le Bleu des fonds, Astres et desastres, 

Le Grand jamais, etc. 

Meets Peter Bramsen, who soon becomes the printer of 

almost all his lithographs at Ateliers Clot, Bramsen and 

Georges, Paris. 

First one-man exhibition of prints in Paris, at Galerie- 

Librairie La Hune. 

Settles in Bougival, near Paris. 

1964 

First one-man exhibition in Copenhagen, at Galerie 

Birch, and in Amsterdam, at Galerie Espace. 

Paints his largest oil to date, The Last Day, acquired by 

Koninklijk Museum voor Schone Kunsten, Antwerp, in 



With other artists contributes illustrations to Ting's 
book 1 ( Life, a project that brings together the protag- 
onists of Cobra and Pop Art, among other movements. 

Classifies the 411 letters Dotremont had written him 
since 1949. 

With Appel and Ting appears in Encre, film on lithogra- 
phy by Jean Cleinge. 



151 



One-man exhib 
American collec 



1965 

Executes Central Park (cat. no. i ), his first acrylic paint- 
ing with marginal remarks: the work from which the 
concept of the present exhibition issues. 
Increasingly abandons oil in favor of acrylic, and for 
supports adopts paper, which he will learn to mount on 
canvas. 

including forty paintings from 
s at The Arts Club of Chicago. 
Stay in New York, interrupted by trip to Mexico. 
Denoel, Paris, publishes his Titres et pains perdus. Notes 
on disappearances, losses of meaning, transmission dif- 
ficulties, blanks, wants and useless persistences. "The ti- 
tles inscribed on the backs of paintings usually live with 
their noses to the wall, in penitence." 

Breton includes Central Park in the Xle (and last) Ex- 
position Internationale dii Surrealisme, Paris. 

1966 

Triennial Prize for Printmaking in Belgium. 

Prize, International Biennial of Printmaking, Krakow 

(ex-aequo). 

Unfolded Newspapers (see cat. nos. 3-6, 8), series of 

narrative drawings which includes All in One Breath 

(cat. no. 2) and for which he writes a commentary. 

1967 

First acrylic painting with a predella (a series of images 
under the principal subject) Under Fire (cat. no. 9). 
New work in graphics with help of Jean Clerte, whom 
he knew at Atelier 17 m 1952: books, engravings and 
lithographs. 

Series of paintings, engravings and drawings on the 
theme of Gilles, hero of the Carnaval de Binche, at 
Stephane Janssen's Galerie La Balance, Brussels; cata- 
logue preface by Pol Bury. 

One-man exhibition of eighty-five drawings, the Ideo- 
traces, at The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. 

1968 

Marzotto-Europe Grand Prize for Painting, Valdagno, 

Italy. 

Sources of Information (see cat. nos. 14-18): inks with 

multiple subjects. 

Drawings on Butor's "tapuscnts": appropriation of the 

author's rejects and rough drafts. Book-object with 

Joyce Mansour: Le Bleu des fonds. 

Drawing for Chateau Mouton-Rothschild label, 1966 

vintage. 

1969 

First retrospective in Belgium, at Palais des Beaux-Arts 
de Bruxelles, which travels to Denmark and Germany. 

Trip to Canary Islands. 




Bougival, 1968, one of the Star and 
Disaster paintings in the background 



152 




Stars and Disasters (see cat. no. 19): diverse works evok- 
ing spheres and wheels. In collaboration with Arman, 
Indivisible Prints, which are dipped in resin. 

Constructs a new studio in Bougival. 

1970 

Second Prize, Festival International de Peinture, Cagnes- 

sur-Mer. 

Luc de Heusch film Alechinsky d'apres nature (narrated 
by Claude Rich, music by Michel Portal, Albina Produc- 
tion, Paris). 

With Jorn and Ting: "paintings for four hands." 
Decorative panel for an Air France Boeing 747. The Vol- 
canoes: Volcanalysis, Volcanology, etc. 
Leaves organizing committee of Salon de Mai, Paris. 



Paints Aztec Volcano (cat. no. 25), gift of Enrico and 
Fiorella Chiari to Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, 
in 1984. 

Trip to Norway. 

Completes his book Roue libre, published by Skira, 
Geneva, in which he discovers a key to Surrealism, lying 
somewhere between Le Musicien de Saint-Merry by 
Guillaume Apolhnaire and The Invisible ( )bject of 
Giacometti, and which evokes Breton, Butor, Cobra, 
Dotremont, Jorn, Ting, etc. 

1972 

Invites Dotremont to share the Belgian Pavilion with 
him at XXXVI Venice Biennale, from which Peggv 
Guggenheim acquires his painting Dressing Gown. 
Yves Riviere classifies the 600 prints completed since 
1946. 

Bird's-Eye View (cat. no. 26), first painting with a black 
and white ink drawing in the center and colored mar- 
ginalia drawn on old manuscript pages (palimpsest prin- 
ciple). 

1973 

Trip to Turkey. 

First retrospective of drawings, at Musee Royal d'Art 
Moderne, Brussels. 

Krach: drawings and engravings on worthless stock cer- 
tificates. 

His L'Avenir de la propriete published by Yves Riviere, 
Paris. 

Death of his father. Death of Jorn at age 59. 

1974 

Trip to Lappland. 

First retrospective of acrylic paintings, 1965-74, at 
Mathildenhohe, Darmstadt, which travels in slightly dif- 
ferent forms to Rotterdam, Paris and Zurich until 1975. 



153 




Fondation Maeght, Saint-Paul-de-Vence, 1974: left to 
right and top to bottom, Nuna Farreras, Ubac, Dupin, 
Farreras, Lelong, Daniele Bourgois, Framboise Simcek, 
Tal-Coat, Elisabeth Dupin, Meurice, Alechinsky, Fre- 
naud, Micky Alechinsky, Louisa Calder, Aguy Ubac, 
Pilar Miro, Miro, Marguerite Maeght, Aime Maeght, 



Helene Dupin, Nicole Meurice, Bazaine, Mako Gardy- 
Artigas, Josep Luis Sert, Fiedler, Pol Bury, Palazuelo, 
Muncha Sert, Pill Chilhda, Chilhda, Calder, Garache, 
Frednkson, Gardy-Artigas, Adami, Camilla Adami, 
Jean-Louis Prat, Christine Dupin, Diego Giacometti, 
Genevieve Picon 



154 



At request of Minister Michel Guy, decorates a dinner 
service, produced by Manufacture Nationale de Porce- 
laine de Sevres, for Ministry of Culture, Paris. 

1975 

Burns 200 paintings which he considers unresolved. 

Permanent Alechinsky Room at Louisiana Museum of 

Modern Art, Humlebaek, Denmark. 

Executes The Sound of the Fall (cat. no. 31) and other 

paintings inspired by the movement of water. 

1976 

Andrew W. Mellon Prize (formerly Carnegie Prize) for 
his entire oeuvre, Museum of Art, Carnegie Institute, 
Pittsburgh. 

Bouches du Rhone Suite (see cat. nos. 33-37), large 
drawings on Taiwan paper, executed at Saint-Remy-de- 
Provence. With Dotremont, mural for a Brussels metro 
station. With Appel, works "for two brushes," col- 
laborative inks, drawings and etchings. 

1977 

Retrospective of works 1946- — at Museum of Art, 

Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh. 

A.M.G., Pans, and Abrams, New York, publish 
Alechinsky: Peintures et ecrits, Alechinsky: Paintings 
and Writings, with his "souvenotes," preface by Eugene 
Ionesco: "Alechinsky is the painter-fisherman, the rod, 
the hook, the water flowing in the river, and the fish, all 
rolled up in one. Now it's struck me that I just stated 
quite simply that this work synthesizes — no, I don't like 
that word — brings together the interior and the exterior. 
Begins drawings and watercolors on d'Arenberg family- 
papers dating from 1 812— 45. 



Retrospective of drawings 1952-78 at Musee National 
d'Art Moderne, Centre Georges Pompidou, Pans. 
Recycled Papers (cat. no. $^), lithographs on facsimiles 
of discarded invoices. 

Joins Galerie Maeght, Paris (Galerie Maeght Lelong 
after 1982.). 



With Pol Bury and Jean-Michel Folon, a campaign of 
mockery directed against "surregionalism" in Belgium 



Large etchings on Taiwan paper. 
Death of Dotremont at age 56. 



Trip to Mexico. In collaboration with Alberto 
Gironella, drawings of bullfights. Retrospective of 
drawings at Museo de Arte Moderno, Mexico City. 
For the 150th anniversary of Belgium, with Hugo Claus 
and Henri Pousseur creates a Gans Belgie-L'Oie beige, a 
form of Snakes and Ladders. 



First ink drawings on maps, then on obsolete airforce 
operational navigational charts. 

Retrospective at Kestner Gesellschaft, Hannover. 

1981 

Pierre Alechinsky: A Print Retrospective, The Museum 

of Modern Art, New York. 

Executes Past Unnoticed (cat. no. 50), his largest acrylic 

painting to date. 

With Matta, "Duo hthographique" for Joyce Mansour's 

poem Le Grand Jamais, published by Maeght, Paris. 

A group of watercolors and drawings is destroyed in a 

fire at Calligrammes Gallery, Ottawa. 

Paints Codex (cat. no. 48), gift of Jerome Brody to 

Guggenheim Museum in 1985. 

1982 

Organizes first retrospective of Dotremont's work, Dor- 

remont, peintre de I'ecriture, shown at Centre Culturel 

de la Communaute Francaise de Belgique, Paris. 

Works in ceramics with Hans Spinner at Fondation 

Maeght, Saint-Paul-de-Vence, France. 

Large India inks with colored borders mounted on 

canvas. 

1983 

Professor of Painting at Ecole Nationale Superieure des 

Beaux-Arts, Paris. 

First paintings with rubbings of manhole covers. 

1984 

National Grand Prize of Arts and Letters for Painting, 
Paris. 

His Ensortileges, texts on Dotremont, James Ensor, Jorn 
and Bram van Velde, published by Fata Morgana, 
Montpellier. 

Drawings on pages from nineteenth-century world atlas. 
Peter & Pierre, film by Ole Henning Hansen about a 
printer and an artist — Bramsen and Alechinsky. 



Creates a stamp for French Postal Service: a Writing 
Wheel on a fragment of a manuscript by Butor (see cat. 
no. 108). At request of Minister Jack Lang, decorates re- 
ception room (walls, ceiling and rug; of Ministry of Cul- 
ture, Paris. Album and Blue: ceramic mural for Musee 
en Plein Air du Sart Tilman, University of Liege. 

1986 

Temporary decorations for elevator entrances on four 
ramps of Guggenheim Museum (cat. no. 87), New York. 
Death of John Lefebre, to whom Margin and Center is 
dedicated. 



155 



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Arrival of Rooskens, Schierbeek, 
Wolvecamp, Brands, Gotz, Corneille, 
Doucet, Alechinsky, Tony Lucebert, El- 
burg, Dotremont, Tajin, Kouwenaar, 
Constant, Appel, Victor Nieuwenhuys, 
Cobra exhibition, Stedelijk Museum, 
Amsterdam, 1949 



SELECTED EXHIBITIONS 



GROUP EXHIBITIONS 
"Indicates that prints only were shown 
Palais des Beaux-Arts, Brussels , Jeune Peinture Beige, 
October 25-November 9, 1947. Catalogue with text by 
Paul Fierens 

Galene Maeght, Paris , Les Mains eblouies, September 
28-November 1, 1948 

Stedelijk Museu m . Amsterdam , lere Exposition Inter- 
nationale a" Art Experimental, ( Dbra, November [949. 
Catalogue published in Cobra, no. 4 
Galene Maeght, Pans , Les Mains eblouies, October 6- 
30, 1950. Catalogue, Derriere le Miroir, no. 52, with 
text by Michel Ragon 

(. lurlottenhorg, Copenhagen , Spiralen, December 30, 
1950-January 14, 1 95 1. Catalogue 
Palais des Beaux-Arts. I lege , zeme Exposition Inter- 
nationale d'Art Experimental, Cobra, October 6- 
November 6, 195 1. Catalogue published in Cobra, no. 1 
Museum of Fine Arts, Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh , 
The 19^2 Pittsburgh International Exhibition of Con- 
temporary Painting, October 16-December 14, 1952. 
Catalogue with text by Gordon Bailey Washburn 
Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam , Dertien belgische schil- 
ders, October-November 1952. Catalogue 

'Kunsthandel Martinet, Amste rdam, Quelques graveurs 
contemporams: Autour de I' Atelier 17, November 26— 
December 23, 1953. Catalogue with text by Stanley 
William Hayter. Traveled to Palais des Beaux-Arts, 
Brussels, January 9-20, 1954; t'Venster, Rotterdam, 
February 27-March 27; Nordisk Kunsthandel, 
Copenhagen, May 20-June; Gallena Numero, Florence, 
December 16, 1954-January 5, 1955 



Gallena Spazio, Rome , Caratteri della pittura d'oggi, 

June 26— July 31, 1954. Catalogue with texts by Luigi 

Moretti and Michel Tapie 

Gallena Schettini, Milan . II gesto: rassegna inter- 

nazionale delle forme libere, June 18-July 18, 1955. 

Catalogue 

Galene Taptoe, Brussels , Dotremont avec Cobra, July 

31-September 26, 1956 

Gemeentemuseum, The Hague , Hedendaagse Belgische 
en Nederlandse Schilderkunst, Facetten 2, November 8, 
1956-January 14, 1957. Catalogue with texts by W. A. 
Beeren and R. W. D. Oxenaar 



I 5 6 



Musee National d'Art Moderne, Pans , Prix 
Guggenheim 1956, November 28-December 16, 1956. 
Catalogue. Traveled to Solomon R. Guggenheim 
Museum, New York, as Guggenheim International 
Award 1956, March 26-June 2, 1957, with checklist 
with text by James Johnson Sweeney 
Stedclijk Museum, Amsterdam , Phasen, May 10-June 
10, 1957. Catalogue with texts by Francois Arnal, Jac- 
ques Audiberti and Camille Bryen, Christian Dotre- 
mont, Edouard Jaguer, Gherasim Luca, Lucebert, Lasse 
Soderberg and the artist 

Palais des l'c.iux Arts^Bnissels, (JiicUjini artistes beiges 
depuis Ensor, April 12-September 30, 1958. Catalogue 
with text by Paul Haesaerts 

Exposition Univ crscllc de Bruxelles, L' Art Beige Con- 
temporain, April 21-October 19, 1958 
Solomon R. ( lUggcnhcim Museum , Ne w Y ork , Twenty 
Contemporary Painters from the Philippe Dotremont 
Collection, Brussels, March 31-May 24, 1959. Cata- 
logue with texts by Paul Fierens and James Johnson 
Sweeney 
Centro Internazionale dclle Arti e del Costume, Palazzo 



Grassi, Venice , Vitalitd nell'arte, August 8-October 4, 
1959. Catalogue with texts by Paolo Marinotti, Henri 
Michaux and Willem Sandberg. Traveled to Kunsthalle 
Recklinghausen, West Germany, November— December; 
Stedehjk Museum, Amsterdam, December 1959-Janu- 
ary i960 

The Minneapolis Institute of Arts , European Art Today: 
3 j Painters and Sculptors, September 3 -October 25, 
1959. Catalogue with texts by James Fitzsimmons and 
Sam Hunter. Traveled to Los Angeles County Museum 
of Art, November 1 i-December 20; San Francisco 
Museum of Art, January 6— February 9, i960; North 
Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh, February 26-April 3; 
National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, April 20-May 24; 
French & Company, Inc., New York, June 7-August 
13; The Baltimore Museum of Art, September 18- 
October 16 

V Bienal do Museo de Arte Moderna de S. Paolo, 
Belgian Section, 1959. Catalogue with text by J. Van 
Lerberghe 

Parke Bernet Galleries, Inc., New York , The Arts of Bel- 
gium 1920-1960, June 29-August 5, i960. Catalogue 
with texts by R. Bodart, K. Jonckeere and J. Van Lerberghe 
Lefebre Gallery, New York , Cobra i960: Alechinsky, 
Cornetlle, Jorn, November 15-December 3, i960. 
Catalogue with text by H. L. C. Jaffe 
Hengelose Kunstzaal, Hengelo, The Netherlands , Ges- 
talten, March 24-Apnl 24, 1961. Catalogue with text 
by H. L. C. Jaffe 



The Arts Club of Chicago , First Midwestern Exhibition 
of Belgian Painters, September 28-October 28, 1961. 
Catalogue with text by J. Van Lerberghe. Traveled to 
The Art Gallery, University of Notre Dame, South Bend, 
Indiana, November 19-December 17; The Toledo 
Museum of Art, January 12-February 12, 1962; Con- 
temporary Arts Center, Cincinnati, March 5— April 12; 
The University Gallery, University of Minnesota, Min- 
neapolis, April 16-May 14 

Galerie Aujourd'hui, Pala is des Beaux-Arts, Brussels , 
Cobra et apres, March 3 1— April 14, 1962. Catalogue 
with text by Joseph Noiret 

Seattle World's Fair , Art since i9\o: American and In- 
ternational, April 21— October 21, 1962. Catalogue with 
texts by Norman Davis and Willem Sandberg 
Castello Cmquecentesco, L'Aquila, Italy , Alternatwi at- 
tuali: Omaggio a Burri, |uly— August 1962. Catalogue 
with texts by Antonio Bandera and Enrico Crispolti 
Galerie Westing , Odense, Denmark , Dotremont: teg- 
ninger skrif, boger og tegneord med Alechinsky, Appel, 
Balle, Claus, February 16-25, 1963 

Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam , Schrift en beeld, May 3- 
June to, 1963. Catalogue with text by Dietrich 
Mahlow. Traveled to Staathche Kunsthalle, Baden- 
Baden, June 14-August 4, 1963 
Museum des 20. Jahrhunderts, Vienna , Idole und 
Ddmonen, July 5-September 1, 1963. Catalogue 

Centro Internazionale delle Am e del Costume, Palazzo 
Grassi, Venice , Visione colore, July 6-October 6, 1963. 
Catalogue with texts by Christian Dotremont and Paolo 
Marinotti 

Staathche Kunsthalle, Bade n-Baden , lllustrationen, Jan- 
uary 21— February 27, 1964. Catalogue with texts by 
Godula Buchholz and Dietrich Mahlow 
kassel. West Germany, Docitmcnta III: Malerei, 
Skulptur, Handzeichnungen, June 27-October 5, 1964. 
Catalogue with text by Werner Haftmann 
Museum voor Scheme Kunsten, Gent, Belgium , Figuratie 
en defiguratiel Figuration et defiguration, July 10-Oc- 
tober 4, 1964. Catalogue with texts by Bernard Dorival, 
J. Geirlandt, Paul Haesaerts, Pierre Restany and Patrick 
Waldberg 

L'Oeil, Paris , L'Ecart absolu: Xle Exposition Inter- 
nationale du Surrealisme, December 7, 1965-January 
1966. Catalogue with texts by Andre Breton, Jose Pierre 
and Jean-Francois Revel 

Solomon R . Gug genheim Museum. New York , Euro- 
pean Drawings, February 24-April 27, 1966. Catalogue 
with texts by Lawrence Alloway and Thomas M. Mes- 



157 



scr. Traveled to University Gallery, University of Min- 
nesota, Minneapolis, May 10—31; DeCordova Museum, 
Lincoln, Massachusetts, June 26-September 4; Museum 
of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, Sep- 
tember 14-Octoher S; The National Gallery of Canada, 
Ottawa, November 28-December 25; Milwaukee Art 
Center, January 5-February 5, 196^; The High 
Museum of Art, Atlanta, March 1— 3 1; Dallas Museum 
of Fine Arts, April 1 5-May 1 5; Krannert Art Museum, 
University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana, May 28-June 
25; The North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh. July 
rj-August 20 

The Public Education Association, Berkeley, California , 
Seven Decades: Crosscurrents in Modern Art, 189 s— 
1965, April 26-May 21, 1966. Catalogue with text by 
Peter Selz 

Museum Bovmans-van Beuningen, Rotterdam , Cobra 
1948/51, May 20-July 17, 1966. Catalogue with text by 
Willemi|n de Haas-Stokvis. Traveled to Louisiana 
Museum of Modern Art, Humlebaek, Denmark, August 
t9-October 2, with catalogue, special issue of Louisiana 
Rcvx, with texts by W. de Haas Stockvis, Knud W. Jen- 
sen, Dahlmann Olsen, Willem Sandberg, the artist et al. 
Musee des Arts Decoratifs, Paris , Bande dessinee et fi- 
guration narrative, April 1967. Catalogue with texts by 
Gerald Gassiot-Talabot and Burne Hogarth 
Ausstellungshallcn Mathildenhohe, Darmstadt, West 
Germany, 2. Internationale der Zeichnung, July 16-Sep- 
tember 10, 1967. Catalogue with text by Otto Stelzer 
Centro Internationale delle Arti e del Costume, Palazzo 
Grassi, Venice , Campo vitale: /nostra intemazionale 
d'arte contemporanea, July 27-October 9, 1967. 
Catalogue with text by Paolo Marinotti 
Royal Dublin Society , Rose '67: The Poetry of Vision, 
An International Exhibition of Modern Painting aiul 
Ancient Celtic Art, November 1 3-December 30, 1967. 
Catalogue with texts by Jean Leymarie, Willem 
Sandberg and James Johnson Sweeney 
Komnkhik Museum voor Schone Kunsten, Antwerp , 
1947— 1967: Kontrasten, Schilderkunst in Belgie, Feb- 
ruary 18-May 12, 1968. Catalogue with texts by W. 
Vanbeselaere and the artist 

National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. , Paintings 
from the Albrigbt-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New 
York, May 19-June 21, 1968. Catalogue with text by 
Gordon Mackintosh Smith 

Kunstmuseum, Lucerne , Neue Formen expressionis- 
tischer Malerei sett /950, July 28-September 22, 1968. 
Catalogue 



Kunsthalle, Darmstadt , Menschenbilder, September 14— 
November 17, 1968. Catalogue with texts by Rolf- 
Gunter Dienst, Arnold Gehlen, Werner Hofmann and 
Wieland Schmied 

Galerie La Balance, Brussels , Alechmsky, Appel, Cor- 
netlle, Dotremont, Jorn, January 8-February 8, 1969. 
Catalogue 

' Tendances Contemporaines, La Louviere, Belgium , f 
Affiches pour un Centenaire: Alechmsky, Pol Bury, 
Folon, Mauncs Henry, Topor, June 7—24, 1969. 
Catalogue with text by Ernest Pirotte (pseud, for Pol Bury) 
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York , Selec- 
tions from the Guggenheim Museum Collection 1900- 
1970, May i-September 13, 1970. Handbook: Selec- 
tions from the Guggenheim Museum Collection 1900- 
1970, with texts by Thomas M. Messer and Louise 
Averill Svendsen and interview of the artist by Jacques 
Putman, published on occasion of exhibition 
Museum of Art, Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh , Pitts- 
burgh International 19-0: Exhibition of Contemporary 
Art, October 30, 1970-January 10, 1971. Catalogue 
with text by Leon A. Arkus 

The Royal Scottish Academy, Edinburgh , Edinburgh In- 
ternational Festival 1971: The Belgian Contribution to 
Surrealism, August 21-September 19, 1971. Catalogue 
with texts by Peter Diamond, Gisele Ollinger-Zinque 
and Roland Penrose. Traveled to Sophienholm Kgs, 
Lyngby, Denmark, October 7-November 14 
Bergens Kunstforening, Bergen, Norway , Cobra 1 Jag, 
January --23, 19-2. Catalogue with texts by Gunnar 
Jespersen and the artist 

Grand Palais, Reunion des Musees Nationaux, Pans , 
Douze am d'art contemporain en France: 1960—1971, 
May-September 1972. Catalogue with texts by Daniel 
Cordier, Maurice Eschapasse, Francois Mathey, Jacques 
Putman, the artist et al. 

Haus der Kunst, Munich , Welt Kulturen und moderne 
Kunst, June 16-September 30, 19-2. Catalogue with 
texts by Manfred Schneckenburger and Siegfried 
Wichmann 

Musee des Beaux-Arts du Havre, Le Havre , Michel 
Butor et ses peintres, March 12-April 15, 19^3. Cata- 
logue with text by Michel Butor. Traveled to Palais des 
Beaux-Arts, Brussels, April 24-May 12; Musee Mas- 
sena, Nice, June 19-July 22 

Galena S. Mamede, Lisbon , Cobra: Alechmsky, Appel, 
Jorn, June 1973. Catalogue with texts compiled by 
Edouard Jaguer 



158 



\ 



7t~*? '£*LJ£* *~ ~ 




^ Nationalgal erig; Berlin, Hotnmage a Picasso, July n- 
August 27, 1973- Catalogue with texts by Werner 
Haftmann and Wieland Schmied 

Museum ot hue Arts, t amebic Instit ute, Pittsburgh , Art 
in Residence: Art Privately Owned in the Pittsburgh 
Area, October 17, 1973-January 6, 1974. Catalogue 
with text by Leon A. Arkus 

''Modern Art in Prints: 1947-1972 (organized by The 
Museum of Modern Art, New York), traveled in Aus- 
tralia, April— September 1973; New Zealand, October 
1973-January 1974; India, February-June; Iran, June- 
July; Japan, September 1974-March 1975. Catalogue 
with text by Riva Castleman 

Gran d Pal ais, Reunion des Mn sees Natm naux, Pans , 
Jean Paulhan a travers ses peintres, February 1— April 
15, 1974. Catalogue with texts by Andre Berne-Joffroy, 
Jean Leymarie and Jean Paulhan 

Hotel de Ville, Brussels , Cobra '48 '51 '74, April 4—28, 
1974. Catalogue with texts by Jacques Calonne, Cons- 
tant, Christian Dotremont, Uffe Harder, Asger Jorn and 
Christiane Rugemer 

Chateau de Saint-Cirq-Lapopie, France , Aspects du sur- 
realisme, July 14-October 1, 1974. Catalogue with text 
by Jose Pierre 

Stadti sche k imsthalle I >u sseldor t, Surrcalitat—Hild- 
realitat 1924-1974: In den unzahligen Bildern des Le- 
bens, December 8, 1974-February 2, 1975. Catalogue 
with texts by Andre Breton, Jurgen Harten and Bern- 
hard Kerber. Traveled to Staatliche Kimsthalle Baden- 
Baden, February 14— April 13 

Galerie Mark, Zurich , 6 from < lobra 1975, January 31— 
February 22, 1975. Catalogue with text by Uffe Harder 
Stedelijk Museum, Sint-Niklaas, Belgium , Cobra 197s, 
September 21-October 26, 1975. Catalogue with texts 
by Anne Choisez and Christian Dotremont. Traveled to 
Maison de la Culture de Namur, Belgium, November 
14-December 7 

Los Angeles ( ountv Museum ot Art, European painting 
in the seventies: new work by sixteen artists, September 
30-November 23, 1975. Catalogue with text by 
Maurice Tuchman. Traveled to St. Louis Art Museum, 
March 16— May 9, 1976; Elveh|em Art Center, Madi- 
son, Wisconsin, June 8-August 1 

Museum of Fine Arts, Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh , In- 
augural Exhibition of the Heinz Galleries, October 25, 
1975-January 4, 1976. Catalogue with texts by Leon A. 
Arkus and David Rockefeller 

Fondation Maeght, Saint-Paul-de-Vence, France , Daily 
Bid and C°, February 7-March 7, 1976. Catalogue. 



159 



Traveled to Studio du Passage 44, Brussels, April 9-May 
2.3; Neue Galerie, Aix-La-Chapelle, West Germany, 
October 16-November 2.1 

The Western A ustralia Art Cillery, Perth. Contempo- 
rary Drawing, May 5—3 1, 1977. Catalogue with texts 
by Lou Klepac and Bertram Whittle 
Musee National d'Art Moderne, Centre Georges Pom- 
pidou, Paris , Paris-New York, June i-September 19, 
1977. Catalogue with texts by Pontus Hulten and the 
artist 

Kassel, West Germany , Documents 6, June 24-October 
2, 1977. Catalogue with text by Wieland Schmied 
Galerie Rus, Trondheim, Norway , Cobra 1948/1978, 
September 14-October 8, 1978. Catalogue with text by 
Per Hovdenakk 

Musee d'Art Moderne de la Villc de Pans , Asger Jorn a 
Silkeborg: le musee d'un peintre, October 14- 
November 12, 1978. Catalogue with texts by Asger 
Jorn, Jacques Lassaigne and Niels Matthiasen 
Nationalgalene, Berlin , 1 Jahre m neuen Hans, De- 
cember 11, 1978-January 21, 1979. Catalogue with 
texts by Dieter Honisch and Stephan Waetzoldt 



Fondacao Calouste Gulbenkian, Lisbon , Arte Belga de- 
pots de 1945", November 1980. Catalogue with text by 
Christian Dotn 



5 Kunstroreningen, Copenhagen , Imprimerte Ittho- 
grapbique Clot, Bramsen & Georges, Paris, April 24- 
July 1, 1979. Catalogue with texts by Charlotte Chris- 
tensen and Antonio Saura. Traveled to Sonderiyllands 
Kunstmuseum, Tender, Denmark, August 25— Sep- 
tember 20; Alvar Aalto Museo, Jyaskvla, Finland, Sep- 
tember 27-October 14; Son|a Hemes og Niels Onstads 
Stiftelser, Hovikkoden, Norway, December 1, 1979- 
January 15, 1980 

Fondanon Maeght, Saint-Paul-de-Vence, France , Des- 
sins de la Fondatton Maeght, March 29-May 31, 1980. 
Catalogue with text by Jean-Louis Prat 
Lefebre Gallery, New York , Salute to Belgium, April 1- 
26, 1980. Catalogue with text by Luc de Heusch 
Palais des Beaux-Arts de Bruxelles , Belgique — Pays- 
Bas: convergences et paralleles dans I'art depuis 1945, 
June 20— August 10, 1980. Catalogue with texts by 
Christian Dotremont and Daniele Gillemon. Traveled to 
Museum Boymans-van Beuningen, Rotterdam, Feb- 
ruary 20— March 22, 198 1 

Abbaye de S aint-S.um-siir-C.artemp e, France , 
Boomerang: une quarantaine d'oeuvres inattendues 
d'une quarantaine d'artistes contemporains, June 22- 
August 17, 1980. Catalogue with texts by Alechinsky on 
Karel Appel, Christian Dotremont, Asger Jorn, Rein- 
houd, Walasse Ting, Bram van Velde and himself 



Musee Nati onal d'Art Moderne, Centre Geo rges Pom- 
pidou, Pans , Paris 1937- Paris 195 7: creations en 
France, May 22-November 2, 1981. Catalogue with 
texts by Agnes Anghviel de Beaumelle, Jean-Claude 
Groshens and Pontus Hulten 

\luseen del Stadt kohl, Wcstkunst. Zeitgennssiiche 
Kunst seit 1919, May 30-August 16, 1981. Catalogue 
with texts by Laszlo Glozer, Kaspar Koenig and Karl 
Ruhrberg 

Espace Lyonnais d'Art Contemporain, Lyon , Perma- 
nence du regard surrealiste, June 30-September 22, 

1 98 1. Catalogue with texts by Edouard Jaguer and the 

Cialerie Birch, Den Fne L'dstilhngshvg nmg. I openha- 
gen , Paris-Koebenhavn, September 5-20, 1981. Cata- 
logue with text by the artist 

Musee des Arts Decoratirs, Pans , I.' art en soie, January 
14—30, 1982. Catalogue with text by the artist. Traveled 
to Musee Historique des Tissus, Lyon, March 23- 
Apnl 30 

Fondation Maeght. Saint-Paul-de-Vence, France , L'Unt- 
vers d'Aime et Marguerite Maeght, July 3 -October 3, 

1982. Catalogue with texts by Andre Chastel, Jean Fre- 
mon, Jean-Louis Prat and the artist 

Rilksmuseum Twenthe, Enschede, The Netherlands , In- 
formele Kunst 194^-1960, December 4, 1982-January 
16, 1983. Catalogue with text by Willemi|n Stokvis. 
Traveled to Dordrechts Museum, The Netherlands, Jan- 
uary 29— March 1 3 

Centre Culture! de la Communaute Franchise de Bel- 
gique Wallonie-Bruxelles, Pans , Dotremont, peintre de 
I'ecriture, avec Cobra, December 8, 1982-January 2, 

1983. Catalogue with texts by Christian Dotremont, 
Jean-Clarence Lambert and the artist 

Musee d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Pans , Cobra 1948- 
1951, December 9, 1982-February 20, 1983. Catalogue 
with texts by Gilles Beraud, Bernadette Contensou and 
Sylvain Lecombre. Traveled to Maison de la Culture, 
Chalon-sur-Saone, France, March 4-April 17; Musee 
des Beaux-Arts, Rennes, April 29-June 12 
Musee Picasso, Chateau Grimaldi, Antibes , "Bonjottr 
Monsieur Picasso," April 1983. Catalogue with texts by 
Marie-Laure Bernadac, Gerald Gassiot-Talabot, Daniele 
Giraudy and the artist 

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York , Acquisi- 
tion Priorities: Aspects of Postwar European Painting, 



May zo-September n, 1983. Catalogue with text by 
Thomas M. Messer 

Galene de la Ganserhaus, Wasserhurg sui I nn, Austria , 
Cobra-Spur-Wir-Geflecht-Kollektw-Herzogstrasse, July 
31-September 15, 1983. Catalogue with text by 
Eberhard Simons. Traveled to Galerie der Kiinstler, 
Munich, November 9-December 2, 1984; Bonner 
Kunstverein, February 7-March 17, 1985; Gesellschaft 
fiir Aktuelle Kunst, Bremen, April 

1 iiky (i Metropolitan I eien An Museum, \lo, /,■/;/ Art in 
the West (organized by Solomon R. Guggenheim 
Museum, New York), October i-December 23, 1983. 
Catalogue with text by Thomas M. Messer 
Centre National des Ar ts Plasti ci nes, Villa Arson, Nice , 
Ecritures dans la peinture, April 6-August 31, 1984. 
Catalogue with texts by Michel Butor, Michel Sicard 
and the artist 

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian 
Institution, Washington, D.C. , Artistic Collaboration in 
the Twentieth Century, June 9-August 19, 1984. 
Catalogue with texts by Robert C. Hobbs, Cynthia Jaf- 
fee McCabe and David Shapir. Traveled to Milwaukee 
Art Center, November 18, 1984-January 15, 1985; J. B. 
Speed Art Museum, Louisville, February 21-April 21 
Tuchtabnk, Trier, West G e rman y. Europaiscbc Malcrci 
der Gegenwart (Spuren und Zeichen), August 25- 
November 18, 1984. Catalogue with texts by Lorenz 
Dittmann, Eugene [onesco and Claus D. Kernig 
De Zonnehof, Amersfoort, The Netherlands , Cobra: av- 
entures collectives, September 18-October 18, 1984. 
Catalogue with texts by Gilles Beraud, Constant, Chris- 
tian Dotremont, Erik Nyholm, the artist et al. Traveled 
to Frans Hals Museum, Haarlem, November 2, 1984- 
January 6, 1985; Kunstindustrimuseet, Copenhagen, 
January 17-February 17; Nordjyllands Kunstmuseum 
Aalborg, Denmark, March 13— April 28; Salle Saint- 
Georges, Liege, May 10-June 16; Maison de la Culture 
de Tournai, Belgium, June 22-August 10 

Museo de Arte Contemporaneo, Caracas , El 
Movimento Cobra en la Coleccion Karel van Stuijven- 
berg, September 1984. Catalogue with texts by Sofia 
Imber, Jean-Clarence Lambert and Christiane Rugemer 
Maison de la Culture Andre Malraux, Reims, France , 
Oeuvres croisees — Michel Butor, November 21- 
December 21, 1984. Catalogue with text by Michel 
Sicard 

Palais des Beaux-Arts de Charleroi, Belgium , Aittour de 
la bande dessinee, January 12-March 3, 1985. Cata- 
logue with texts by Laurent Busine, Jacques Lacarriere, 
Gilbert Lascault and Jean-Hubert Martin 



Solomon R. Guggenheim M useum, New York , Pain- 
terly Visions, 1940-1984, June 28-September 3, 1985. 
Brochure with text by Susan B. Hirschfeld 

'Chateau de la Koihc-Jag u, Ploezal. France , Daily Bui 
1955— 1985: 30 annees d'editions d'activite, July 7-Sep- 
tember 30, 1985. Catalogue with texts by Pol Bury et al. 
National Museum of Art, t )saka, J apan , Action et emo- 
tion: peintures des annees 50, September 27-November 
26, 1985. Catalogue with texts by Jean-Clarence Lam- 
bert and Sylvain Lecombre 

Museum of Art, F ort 1 auderdale. Florida, Masterworks 
from the Meyer and Golda Marks Cobra Art Collection, 
January 18-March 30, 1986. Catalogue 
Hara Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo , Cobra: 
Karel van Stuijvenberg Collection, Caracas, February 
15— March 19, 1986. Catalogue with text by Sylvain 
Lecombre 

" City Gallery, Department of Cultural Affairs, New- 
York , Books and Graphics of Cobra Artists, March 28- 
April 26, 1986. Catalogue with text by Willemi|n 
Stockvis 

Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humlehaek, Den- 
mark, Portrait of a Collector: Ste'phane Janssen, April 
5-May 11, 1986. Catalogue with texts by Stephane 
Janssen and Knud W. Jensen. Traveled to University Art 
Museum, California State University, Long Beach, Janu- 
ary 27-March 8, 1987 

Galerie Artcurial, Paris, L'Aventurc surrealiste autour 
d' Andre Breton, May 13-July 31, 1986. Catalogue with 
text by Jose Pierre 

Centre Lotois des Arts Cuntemporains, Musee de 
Cahors, France , Changer la vue, July-August 1986. 
Catalogue with text by Jose Pierre 

Sala Mendoza, Caracas, Cobra sobre papel (Karel van 
Stuijvenberg Collection), September 14-October 5, 
1986. Catalogue 

Philadelphia Museum of Art , Philadelphia Collects Art 
Since 1940, September 28-November 30, 1986. 
Catalogue with texts by Anne d'Harnoncourt, Ann 
Percy and Mark Rosenthal 

Konsthall Malmo, ( 'obra as Reflected by the Karel van 
Stuijvenberg Collection, October 31-December 17, 
1986. Catalogue with texts by Jean-Clarence Lambert 
and Lasse Soderberg. Traveled to Taipei Fine Arts 
Museum, January 10— March 15, 1987; Liljevalchs 
Konsthall, Stockholm, June 12-September 6 
Kunstforenmgen, Copenhagen, Fransk Visit, Galerie 
Maeght Lelong besoger Kunstforeningen, November 
14-December 14, 1986. Catalogue. Traveled to Gum- 



l6l 



mesons Konstgallen, Stockholm, January io-I 
4. C987 

Galene Espace, Amsterdam, Galerie Espace i< 
1986, November 16, 1986— January 1-, 1987 



Galene Ja 



Ostier, Pans, Les Sources Japonaises de 
V art occidental, November 18, 1986— February 28, 
1 98-. Catalogue with texts by Nelly Delay, Elisabeth 
Ostier, Antoni Tapies, Gabnelle Van Zuylen, the artist 
et al. 

kunst Foru m, Se heli.leroi.le. Belgi um, Alechinsky: 
lithographies etsen, December 6, 1986— February 1, 
19S- 
Au Theatre du Rond-Point, Cie Renaud-Barrault, Pans, 



Sous le signe du Taureau, December 9, 
2.5, E987. Catalogue 



)8h-)a 



ONE-MAN EXHIBITIONS 

Oaiene 1 011 C osyn, Brussels, Pierre Alechinsky, April 

15-14, 1947 

Galene Apollo, Brussels , Fetes, trouble-fete, peintures, 

etc., November 6-18, 1948. Catalogue with text by Luc 

Zangne (pseud, for Luc de Heusch) 

Le Diable par la Queue, Brussels, Alechinsky (with [an 

Cox and Marc Mendelson), April 22-May 10, 1950 

Kunsthandel Martinet, Amsterdam , L'arbre et I'arme 
(with Shinkichi Tajiri), February-March 1953. Cata- 
logue with text by Christian Dotremont 
Gallena Schwarz, Milan, Alechinsky, October 18-31, 
1954 
Galene Nina Dausset, Pans, Alechinsky, November 19- 



1954- Catalogue with text by Chr 



December 1 5, 

Dotremont 

Palais des Beaux-Arts, Brussels , Alechinsky, March 26- 

Apnl 10, 1955. Catalogue 

N_ab]s <_,allcr\ , I ok\o. \lechmsk\ . September 9-2 3, 



Galene du Dragon, Pans , Alechinsky, May 15-30, 1956 
Galene Espace, Haarlem , Alechinsky, January 18-Feb- 



ruary 9, 1957 
Galene Auiourd'hi 



Brussels, Pierre Alechinsky: des- 



sins, October 2.6— November 9, 



Galene Michel Warren, Pans, Alechinsky, November 

15— December 7, 1957 

Galerie Michel Warren, Pans, Alechinsky (with Jean 

Messagier and Bram van Velde), November 1 3-De- 

cember 13, 1958. Catalogue 

Institute of Contemporary Arts, London, Alechinsky, 

1958 

Kunsthalle Bern, 4 Metier: Tapies, Alechinsky, Mes- 
sagier, Moser, September 26-October 25, 1959. 
Catalogue with text by Franz Meyer 
XXX Biennale di Venezia, Belgian Pavilion, July i960. 
Catalogue with text by Franz Meyer 

< i.ilene I >. Benadoi , I iene\ a, Alci hmsky, < )ctober 1 yfto. 
Catalogue with text by Jacques Putman 
Kunstknng, Rotterdam, Alechinsky, peintures; 
Reinhoud, sculptures, March 31— April 30, 1961. 
Traveled to Stedeli|k Museum, Amsterdam, as 
Alechinsky + Reinhoud, May 26-June 26, with 
catalogue with text by Jacques Putman 
Galerie van de Loo, Munich, Pierre Alechinsky: 
Aquarelle und Tuschzeichnungen, October 1 3- 



November 30, 1961. Catalogue with texts by Christian 
Dotremont and the artist 

Museum of Art, Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh , The 
1961 Pittsburgh International Exhibition of Contempo- 
rary Painting and Sculpture, one-man exhibition, Octo- 
ber 27, 1961-January 7, 1962. Catalogue with text by 
Gordon Bailey Washburn 

Lefebre Gallery, New York, Alechinsky: oils drawings 
watercolors, February 17-March 24, 1962. Catalogue 
with text by Walasse Ting 

Galene de France, Paris , Alechinsky, May 2-28, 1962. 
Catalogue with text by Jean-Francois Revel 
Stedelijk Museum. Amsterdam , Que d'encre...wat een 
inkt, January 18-March 4, 1963. Catalogue with dia- 
logue between Jacques Putman and the artist 
Stedelijk van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven, The Nether- 
lands, Alechinsky, March 22-April 29, 1963. Catalogue 
with text by Hugo Claus 

Galene-Libraine La Hune, Pans , Alechinsky, May 8- 
31, 1963. Catalogue with text by the artist 
VII Bienal do Museo de Arte Moderna de S. Paulo 
Alechinsky ,with Marchoul and Remhoud), 1963. 
Catalogue with text by Edouard Jaguer 
Galene de France, Pans , Remhoud, Alechinsky et Ting: 
solo de sculpture et divertissement arrange pour pein- 
ture a auatre mams. October 25— November 25, 1963. 
Catalogue with text by the artist 

Lefebre Gallery, New York . Alechinsky: recent icorks, 
November 5-December 7, 1963. Catalogue with text by 
Edouard Jaguer 

Galerie Birch, Copenhagen , Alechinsky, January 9-23, 
1964. Catalogue with text by Christian Dotremont 
Instituto Torcuato di Telia, Museo de Artes Visuales, 
Buenos Aires , Das artistas belgas: Alechinsky y 
Reinhoud, March 18-April 12, 1964. Catalogue with 
texts by Jorge Romero Brest and Edouard Jaguer 
Galene Espace. Amsterdam , Alechinsky: Tekenmgen — 
Grafiek, April 15-May 6, 1964 
Gallena 11 Punto Arte -Moderna, Turin , Alechinsky, 
opened May 8, 1964. Catalogue with text by Ernest 
Pirotte (pseud, for Pol Bury) 

The Arts Club of C hicago , Pierre Alechinsky, February 
26-March 27, 1965. Catalogue with text by Jacques 
Busse. Traveled to University Gallery, University of 
Minnesota, Minneapolis, April 7-May 4; The Jewish 
Museum, New York, May 1 5 -June 1 5 
Lefebre Gallery, New York , Alechinsky: recent works, 
April 13-May 8, 1965. Catalogue with dialogue be- 
tween Jacques Putman and the artist 



163 




Stcddijk Museum, \msterdam. Met hnisky vi.ihch, 

een kcuzc tut io<; litho's en etsen gemaakt de jaren 

1947—1965, February [7— March 1-, 1966. Catalogue 

with text bj the artist 

I. L. Hudson Gallery, Detroit , Alechinsky, < '01 italic, 

lorn, Reinhoud, March 2.3— April 16, 1966 

La Medusa, Rome , Alechinsky, May-June 1966. 

Catalogue with text by Enrico Crispolti 

Galene I. a B alaiKc. Bru ssels , Alechinsky, Appcl, 

Rcinhitud, September 22— October 1 s, i9ii'-> 

Galene de France, Paris , Alechinsky: ncurics lecentes, 

Nov 



The Mu 



iber 9, [966— January 8, 1967 

1 of Fine Arts, Houston , Wash Drawings h; 



Pierre Alechinsky, April 6— May 3, 1967 
Lefebre Gallery, New York , Alechinsky: recent works, 
April 18-May 14, 1967. Catalogue with texts by 
Jacques Putman and the artist 

" Galcrie-Libraine l a Hnne, Paris , Alechinsky: 1111 en- 
semble d'impressions, May 19-June 14, [967 

' Galene van de Loo, Munich , Pierre Alechinsky: 10 
jahre unpressionen oeuvrekatalog druckgraphik, Sep- 
tember 27-October 23, 1967. Catalogue with text by 
Yvon Taillandier. Traveled to Stadtische Kunstgaleric, 
Bochum, West Germany, December 22, 1967— January 
11, E968; Kunstverein Freiburg, March 24-Apnl 21 
li.ilcne I 1 Pialaiue, l'.iussjs, 1'ierre Alechinsky: ,1 
propos ile Bniche, November 16-Decemher 9, 196-. 
Catalogue with text by Ernest Pirotte (pseud, for Pol 
Bury) 

'' Galene Moderne, Silkeborg, Denmark , Pierre 
Alechinsky: So Grafiske Ai be]der, January 14-February 
1, 1968. Catalogue 

Galene de Fr an ce, Paris , Pierre Alechinsky: suite 
acrylique avec quelques notes concomitantes, March 8- 
23, 1968. Catalogue with text by the artist 
Galene de l'A.P.I.A.W., Liege , Pierre Alechinsky: 
Ideotraces, March 30-Apnl 10, 1968. Catalogue 
Letebre Gallery, New York , The 11th Pierre Alechinsky 
exhibition in the United States, November 5- 30, 1968. 
Catalogue with text by Julio Cortazar 
Galerie Birch, Copenhagen , Alechinsky, November 7— 
16, 1968. Catalogue 

Palais des B eaux Arts, Brussels , Pierre Alechinsky, Janu- 
ary 7-February 2, 1969. Traveled to Louisiana Museum 
of Modern Art, Humlebaek, Denmark, with catalogue 
with texts by Luc de Heusch and Chris Yperman, Feb- 
ruary 14-March 2; Kunstverein fur die Rheinlande und 
Westfalen, Diisseldorf, as Pierre Alechinsky: Werke 



ni<;S- 1 i)i>S, March 1 i-April 13, with catalogue with 
texts by Karl-Heinz Henng, Luc de Heusch, Chris Yper- 
man and the artist; Kunsthalle Bremen, West Germany, 
as Pierre Alechinsky: Gemalde 1958-1968, June 5— July 
13, with catalogue with texts by Jacques Putman, Jiirgen 
Schultze and the artist 

Galene de Montreal , Pierre Alechinsky, February 2.5— 
Apnl 1 2, 1969. Catalogue with text by Pierre Descargues 
The J. L. Hudson Gallery, Detroit , Pierre Alechinsky: 
recent paintings, October 29-November 29, 1969. 
Catalogue 

London Arts Ciallerv , Alechinsky: astres et desastres, 
February 19-March 19, 1970. Catalogue with text by 
Julio Cortazar 

Israel Museum, Jerusalem , Drawings and Prints by 
Pierre Alechinsky, April-May 1970. Catalogue with 
texts by Yona Fischer and the artist 
Gallena Rotta, Milan , Alechinsky, April 23-May 23, 
1970. Catalogue with text by Franco Russoli 
Gallery Nippon, Tokyo , Alechinsky, Voss, Weiss, Sep- 
tember 21-October 10, 1970. Catalogue 
Letebre Gallery, New York , Alechinsky: recent paint- 
ings and drawings, October 20— November 14, 1970. 
Catalogue with text by the artist 
Galene Birch, Gopenhagen , Alechinsky, le plaisir de 
peindre, December 2-19, 1970. Catalogue with texts by 
Borge Birch and Gunnar Jespersen 
Grand Rapids Art Museum, Michigan , Paintings by 
Pierre Alechinsky — Sculptures by Reinhoud, March 1 2- 
Apnl 11, 1 97 1. Catalogue with texts by Fred A. Myers 
and Jacques Putman 

Gallen Haaken, Oslo , Pierre Alechinsky, September 4- 
October 3, 1971. Catalogue 

Lens Fine Art, Antwerp , Alechinsky, December 10, 
1971-January 29, 1972. Catalogue with text by the 

Letebre Gallery, New York , Alechinsky: recent paint- 
ings and watercolors, March 7— April 1, 1972. 
Catalogue with text by the artist 

Maison des Jeunes et de la Culture-Novel and Annecy 
Action Culturelle, Annecy, France , Pierre Alechinsky, 
Ideotraces, 85 dessins originaux et publications diverses, 
May 1-31, 1972. Catalogue with text by the artist 
" Galene in d er Blutgasse, Vienna, Pierre Alechinsky, 
May 23-June 10, 1972. Catalogue with text by Alfred 
Schmeller 

XXXVI Biennale di Veuezia, Belgian Pavilion, 
Alechinsky, June-September 1972. Catalogue with texts 



164 



by Julio Cortazar, Joyce Mansour, Willem Sandberg, 
Louis Scutenaire, Giorgio Soavi and the artist 

( ..drill' ill' 1 i. ll in , I '.ill'.. M<\ I'.'ir l:v ,i 1. 1 livjir. |.lliu.ir\ 
25-March 18, 1973. Catalogue with text by Joyce 
Mansour 

" Galleria del Milione, Milan , Pierre Alechinsky. 
L'Avenir de la Propriete, March 9— April 9, 1973 

Galerie Birch, Copenhagen, Alechinsky, April 3—14, 
1973. Catalogue with texts by Borge Birch and the 
artist 

Lefebre Gallery, New York , The l.efehre collection of 
Pierre Alechinsky, September 18-October 13, 1973. 
Catalogue with text John Lefebre 

Lefebre Gallery, New York, Pierre Alechinsky: recent 
paintings and watercolors, October 16-November 10, 

1973. Catalogue with text by John Lefebre 
Lens Fine Art, Antwerp , Alechinsky, November 15, 
1973-January 12, 1974. Catalogue with text by Ivo 
Michiels and the artist 

Galerie Stephane |anssen, Brussels, Alcchinskx. ac- 
ryliques aquarelles, November 23, 1973— January 26, 

1974. Catalogue 

Musee Royal d'Art Moderne, Brussels, Alechinsky: 
cent vingt dessins, donation de I'artiste, December 14, 
1973-January 6, 1974. Catalogue with texts by Fran- 
cine-Claire Legrand and Philippe Roberts-Jones 
Mathilden ho he, Darmstadt , Pierre Alechinsky, June 8- 
July 21, 1974. Catalogue with text by Bernd krimmel 
and the artist 

Nordjyllands Kunstmuseum, Aalborg, Denmark, 
Alechinsky, September 14-October 13, 1974. 
Catalogue with text by Gunnar Jespersen 
Museum Boymans-van Beuningen, Rotterdam , 
Alechinsky, November 15, 1974- January 5, 1975. 
Catalogue with texts by Roger Caillois, Amos Kenan, 
Jacques Lassaigne and the artist. Traveled to Musee 
d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, February 5— April 6 

:> Le Miroir d'Encre, Brussels, Epreuves d 'artiste, 
With Henri Michaux, Joyce Mansour, November 19-December 19, 1974. Catalogue 

Elisa Breton, Musee d'Art Moderne de Galeria Turner, Madrid , Alechinsky, February 28- 

la Ville de Pans, 1975 March ?I) I9?5 Catalogue with text by Antonio Saura 

Kunsthaus Zurich , Pierre Alechinsky, April 27-June 1, 

1975. Catalogue with texts by Michel Butor, Antonio 
Saura, R. Wehrh and the artist 

Galerie va n de Lou, Munich , Alechinsky I9~i, 
December 4— 23, 1975. Catalogue 
Maison de la Culture de Chalon-sur-Saone, France, La 
terre et les volcans, Alechinsky, November 1975-Janu- 



165 




an t 97 6. ( atalogue with texts by Michel Butor, Jules 
Verne, Alexandre Vialatte, the artist et al. Traveled to 
Musee Municipal des Beaux-Arts, I ahors, France, [uly 

z-September 4 

* Alechinsky a I'imprimerie (organized hy Musee 
National d'Art Moderne, Pans), traveled in France, 
1975-79. (. atalogue 

Galerie Birch, Copenhagen , Alechinsky: travaux rares, 
March 3-12, 19-6. Catalogue 
Lefebre Gallery, New York , "'The color of time" ;o 
aquarelles and 4 large brushdrawmgi by Alechinsky, 
March 9-April 10, 1976. Catalogue with text by Harrv 
Torczyner 

Arte Fiera 76, Galerie de France, Bologna , Alechinsky, 
May 2.2.-30, 1976. Catalogue 

' Saint Mary's University Art Gallery, Halifax , 
Alechinsky, June 6-30, 1977- Catalogue 
Galerie de France, Pans , Alechinsky: grandes encres et 
petits tableaux, en compagme de quelques sculptures: 
Reinhoud, June 7-July 30, 1977. Catalogue with text by 
Freddy de Vree 

Museum of Art, Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh , 
Alechinsky, October 28, 1977-January 8, 1978. 
Catalogue with texts by Leon A. Arkus, Eugene Ionesco 
and the artist. Traveled to Art Gallery of Ontario, 
March 10-April 20 

Lefebre Gallery, New York , Alechinsky, November 1- 
December 3, 1977. Catalogue 

Lens Fine Art, Antwerp , Pierre Alechinsky, December 8, 
19-7-January 21, 1978. Catalogue 
' Kaneko Art Gallery, Tokyo , Pierre Alechinsky, 1977. 
Catalogue 

Musee National d'Art Moderne, Centre Georges Potn- 
pidou. Pans , Dessins d'Alechinsky, July 1 1- September 
1 1, 1978. Catalogue with texts by Pierre Georgel, Mar- 
cel Lecomte and the artist. Traveled to Dordrechts Mu- 
seum, The Netherlands, September 23-November 12 
Loranger Gallery, Toronto , Alechinsky, March 1 1- 
April 20, 1978 

Galerie de France, Paris , Appel et Alechinsky: Encres a 
deux pmceaux, October 12-November 30, 1978. Appel 
et Alechinsky: lucres a deux pmceaux et leurs poemes 
par Hugo Claus, Yves Riviere-A.M.G., Pans, 1978, with 
text by Christian Dotremont and poems by Hugo Claus 
published as catalogue. Traveled to Musee d'lxelles, 
Brussels, January 16- February 25, 1979; Musee des 
Beaux-Arts, Ostend, 1979; Dordrechts Museum, The 
Netherlands, May 1 i-|une 30; Louisiana Museum of 
Modern Art, Humlehaek, Denmark, August 16-Sep- 



tember 9; Amos Anderson Konstmuseum, Helsinki, 
1979; Sonia Henies og Niels Onstads Stiftelser, Hovik- 
koden, Norway, December 1979-Jaiiu.irv 1 5, [980; 
Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe, France, June 22-August 1 
Galerie Van de Loo, Munich , Pierre Alechinsky: Vieux 
papiers, November 1978. Catalogue with text by the 

' Galerie Omme, Silkehorg, Denmark , Pierre Alechin- 
sky: Graphik, February 1 --March 17, 1979 
Galerie Espace, Amsterdam , Alechinsky, April --May 
27, 1979- Catalogue 

Galerie Birch, I openhagen , Alechinsky: "Articles 
suivis, " April-May 1979. Catalogue 
Galerie Rolf Ohse, Bremen , Pierre Alechinsky: Vieux 
Papiers Aquarelles 1977—1978, May 4-June 9, 1979. 
Catalogue with text by the artist 

Chapelle de la Charite, Aries , Alechinsky & Reinhoud, 
June 30-September 16, 1979. Catalogue with text by- 
Jacques Putman 

Galerie Albertstrasse, Graz, Austria , Pierre Alechinsky, 
September 1 3 -October 31, 1979 

Lefebre Gallery, New York , Pierre Alechinsky: paint- 
ings on paper and three monumental etchings, October 
9-November to, 1979. Catalogue with text by Carlos 
Fuentes 

' Galerie L'Ollave, Lyon , Alechinsky: lithographies 
recentes, January 10-February 2, 1980. Catalogue with 
text by Jean Raine 

" Sara Campbell Blatter Gallery, University of Houston , 
Pierre Alechinsky: A Print Retrospective (organized by 
The Museum of Modern Art, New York), January 1 1— 
February 24, 1980. Catalogue with text by Riva Castle- 
man. Traveled to San Jose Museum of Art, May 14- 
June 29; Edwin A. Ulrich Museum of Art, Wichita State 
University, September 24-November 2; Art Gallery of 
Hamilton, Ontario, December 1, 1980-January 1 1, 
1981; Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, February 27- 
April 1 2; The Museum of Modern Art, New York, June 
10-August 1 1 

Museo de Arte Moderno, Mexico City , Pierre 
Alechinsky, April 29-July 1980. Catalogue with texts 
by Carlos Fuentes, Fernando Gamboa and the artist 
Galerie Maeght, Paris , Travaux d'impression, prmci- 
palement, March 5— April 30, 1980. Catalogue with text 
by Georges Duby 

Galerie Maeght, Zurich , Alechinsky, October 9- 
November 30, 1980. Catalogue with texts by Eugene 
Ionesco and the artist 



166 



Kestner Gesellschatt. Hannover , Pierre Alechinsky: Bil- 

der, Aquarelle, Zeichnungen: eine Retrospektive, 

November --December 7, 19 So. Caralogue with texts 

bv Roger Caillois. Julio Cortazar. Christian Dotremont, 

Carlos Fuentes, Carl Haenlein, Eugene Ionesco, Antonio 

Saura and the artist 

Lens Fine Art. Antwerp , Pierre Alechinsky, April z— May 

17, 1981. Catalogue 

Lefgbre Gallerv. N'ew York , Alechinsky, June 1 6-July 2, 

September S-October io, 1981. Catalogue 

Calligrammes Gallery. Ottawa , Alechinsky, June 25- 

Julv27, I9S1 

Galene Maeght. Paris . Alechinsky: encres stir cartes de 
navigation et peintures de I'annee, October 8— Novem- 
ber 16, 1981. Catalogue. Derriere le Miroir, no. 14-. 
with texts by Jean Fremon and Antonio Saura 
Letebre Gallery. New York . Pierre Alechinsky: ink over 
maps 6~ charts, October 13-November 14, 1981. Cata- 
logue with texts by James Johnson Sweeney and the 
artist 

' Louis Calder Memorial Library. Miami , Pierre 
Alechinsky: A Print Retrospective, May 1— June 30, 
1982. Catalogue 

' Galeria Sloane Racotta. Mexico Citv . Alechinsky, June 
17-July 9, 1982. Catalogue with texts by Alberto 
Gironella and the artist 

'' Galerie Moderne. Silkeborg. Denmark , Pierre 
Alechinsky, October 2—30, 1982 

Galene Birch. Copenhagen . Alechinsky: Flora Danica, 
November 16— December 1, 1982. Catalogue with text 
by Henrik Bramsen 

Fondation Maeght. Saint- Paul-de-Vence. France . Appel 
et Alechinsky: encres a deux pinceaux, peintures, etc., 
December iS, 1982— January 30, 19S3. Catalogue with 
texts by Christian Dotremont, Claude Esteban and the 
artist and poems by Hugo Claus. Traveled to Musee 
Saint-Georges, Liege, October 28-December 4, 1983 



Museo Espanol de Arte Conternp* 



Madrid, Pierre 



Alechinsky, Alberto Gironella, "Al Alimon, " May 20- 
June 1983. Catalogue with texts by Jose Allyon, Julio 
Cortazar, Salvador Elizondo, Carlos Fuentes, Fernando 
Gamboa, Octavio Paz, Juan Rulfo, Antonio Saura and 
the artist 

Galerie M, Hannover . Les Arrondissements de Paris, 
November 10-December 18, 1983. Catalogue with text 
by Jiirgen Schulrze 

Galerie Espace. Amsterdam , Encrier de voyage, De- 
cember 13, 1983-January 2.1, 1984. Catalogue with 
texts bv Michel Butor and Michel Sicard 



Letebre Gallery. New York . Alechinsky. February' 14— 
March 1 7, 19S4. Catalogue with texts by Michel Butor, 
Michel Sicard and the artist 
Kaneko Art Gallery, Tokvo , Pierre Alechinsky, April 9- 



Renault Art et Industrie, Abbave de Senanque, Gordes, 
France , Alechinsky: encres et peintures 19S1-19S4, 
May 22-September 3, 1984. Alechinsky: frontieres et 
bordures. Editions Galilee, Pans, 1984, with texts by 
Michel Butor, Michel Sicard and the artist, published as 
catalogue 

Galerie Maeght Lelong. FIAC, Grand Palais, Paris , En- 
cres a bordures: Alechinsky, October 19—28, 1984. 
Catalogue with text by Max Loreau 
Le Mejan. Aries . Alechinsky: Pages et feuilles, April 13— 
May 30. 1985 

Galene Birch. Copenhagen . Pierre Alechinsky: pieces 
uniques, May 2-15, 1985. Catalogue 
Galerie van de Loo. Munich . Pierre Alechinsky: encrier 
de voyage. May 2-June 5, 1985. Catalogue with text by 
the artist 

Gana Gallerv. Seoul . Alechinsky. May 10—18, 1985. 
Catalogue 

Maison de la Culture de La Rochelle et du Centre- 
Quest, La Rochelle. France. Pi m Alechinsky. June 15- 
August 31, 1985. Catalogue with texts by Claude 
Hudelot and the artist 

Musee d'Art et d'Histoire. Metz. France , Alechinsky: 
encres et peintures a bordures. November 22— December 
15, 1985. Catalogue with text by Pierre Descargues 
Letebre Gallerv. New York . 1 j Years Eefebre Gallery: 
Pierre Alechinsky, April i-May 17, 1986. Catalogue 
with texts by Julio Cortazar and the artist 
Galerie Maeght Lelong. Pans . Pierre Alechinsky: 
Bouches et Grilles, April 29-July 27, 1986. Catalogue 
with text by Pierre Descargues 

' Arteurial. Pans . Alechinsky: epreuves devenues rares. 
May 13— June 7, 1986 

" Galleri Torso, Odense, Denmark . Alechinsky, June 7— 
July 5 , 1986 

Galerie Lea. Gredt. Luxembourg . Alechinsky, 
November -—December 14, 1986 

' Galene La Hune. Paris . Poemes a voir — jean Tardieu, 
Pierre Alechinsky, January 13-February 11, 198- 
Galerie Maeght Lelong. New York . Alechinsky. March 
27-May 9, 19S- 



167 



SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY 



BY THE ARTIST 

Titrcs et pams perdus, Denoel, Pans, 1965 

Identifies, Denoel, Paris, 1966 

he Tout Veuant, Galeae de France, Paris, 1966 

Le test dit titre, Eric Losfeld, Pans, 1967 

Ting's Studio, Les Poquettes volantes, Daily Bui, La 

Louviere, Belgium, 1967 

Roue libre, Les senders de la creation, Albert Skira, 

Geneva, 1971 

L' Auenir de la propnete, Yves Riviere, Pans, 1973 

Far Rockaway, Fata Morgana, Montpellier, 1977 

Alechinsky: Peintures et ecrtts, Yves Riviere-A.M.G., 

Paris, 1977, and Alechinsky: Paintings and Writings, 

Harry N. Abrams, New York, 1977. Preface by Eugene 

Ionesco 

Le bureau du titre. Fata Morgana, Montpellier, 1983 

Ensortileges, Fata Morgana, Montpellier, 1983 

ILLUSTRATED BOOKS 

Marcel Lecomte, Le Sens des tarots, E.N.S.A.A.D., 

Brussels, 1948 

Luc de Heusch, Les Metiers, E.N.S.A.A.D., Brussels, 

1948. Reprinted Pans, 1979 

Hugo Claus, Zander vorm van Process, Draak, Brussels, 

1950 

Christian Dotremont, Vues, Laponie, Brussels, 1957. 

With Karel Appel, Corneille and Asger Jorn 

Christian Dotremont, La Reine des murs, Galene de 

France, Paris, i960 

Christian Dotremont, Mot qui j'avais, Girard, Paris, 196 

Amos Kenan, adapted by Chnstiane Rochefort, Les 

tireurs de langae, Fratelli Pozzo, Turin, 196 1 

Amos Kenan, A la gare, Grafica Uno, Milan, 1962 
Andre Balthazar, La Personne du singulier, Daily Bui, 
La Louviere, Belgium, 1973 

WalasseTing, U Life, Kornfeld, Zurich, 1964. With 
Karel Appel, Alan Davie, Asger Jorn, Roy Lichtenstein, 
Robert Rauschenberg, Bram van Velde et al. 

Joyce Mansour, Carre blanc, Le Soleil Noir, Paris, 1965 

Communication: 16 manifestations d'hypertrophie cal- 
ligraplnque. Daily Bui, La Louviere, Belgium, 1967 

Francois Nourissier, De la mort, La Balance, Brussels, 
1967 

Julio Cortazar, Histoire des < 'ronopiens et des Fameux, 
Les Poquettes volantes, Daily Bui, La Louviere, Belgium, 



Joyce Mansour, Le Bleu des fonds, Le Soleil Noir, Paris, 

1968 

Achille Chavee, .4;/ demeurant. Daily Biil, La Louviere, 

Belgium, 1969 

Michel Butor, Hoine-Voirie, Olivetti, Milan, 1970 

Joyce Mansour, Astres et desastres. The London Art 

Gallery, London, 1970 

Louis Scutenaire, Pointes, Georges Visat, Paris, 1972. 

Jean-Clarence Lambert, Laborinthe, Georges Fall, Paris, 

1973 

Roger Caillois, Un Mannequin sur le trottoir, Yves 

Riviere, Paris, 1974 

P. A. Benoit, Entre le police et I'index, P.A.B., Ales, 

1975 

Michel Butor, Rive de I'ammonite, Fata Morgana, 

Montpellier, 1975 

Yves Bonnefoy, Par experience, F.B., Paris, 1976 

Michel Butor and Jean-Yves Bosseur, Materiel pour un 

Don Juan, La Louve de l'hiver, Losnes, 1977 

Jorge Luis Borges, Treize poetries, translated by Roger 

Caillois, Fata Morgana, Montpellier, 1978 

Marcel and Gabriel Piqueray, Monument Tobacco, 

Y'ves Riviere, Paris, 1978 

E.-M. Cioran, Vacillations, Fata Morgana, Montpellier, 

1979 

Andre Frenaud, La Vie comme elle tourne, Maeght, 

Pans, 1979 

Pol Bury, Le Derisoire absolu, Daily Bui, La Louviere, 

Belgium, 1980 

Joyce Mansour, Le Grand /annus, Maeght, Paris, 1981. 

With Matta 

Jean-Michel Reynard, Maint corps des cbambres, 

Maeght, Paris, 198 1 

Y'ves Bonnefoy, L'Excedante, F.B., Pans, 1982 

Georges Duby, "Papiers traites," Calendrier 1984, La 

Pierre d'Alun, Brussels, 1983 

Jacques Dupin, De singes et de mouches, Fata Morgana, 

Montpellier, 1983 

Gilbert Lascault, Arrondissements, Reperes, Daniel 

Lelong, Paris, 1983 

Camille Bryen, Mots bavards, P.A.B., Ales, 1984 

Michel Butor, Le Men rot, Reperes, Daniel Lelong, 

Pans, 1985 

Michel Butor and Michel Sicard, ABC de correspon- 

dance, Reperes, Daniel Lelong, Pans, 1986 

Jean Tardieu, Poemes a voir, RLD, Pans, 1986 

Jean Tardieu, Carta Cant a, RLD, Paris, 1987 



168 



MONOGRAPHS 

Luc Zangrie (pseud, for Luc de Heusch), Alechinsky, Les 

Artistes libres, vol. i, Bibliotheque de Cobra, 

Munksgaard, Copenhagen, 1950 

Jacques Putman, Pierre Alechinsky, Fratclli Fabbn, 

Milan, Odege, Paris, 1967 

Alain Bosquet, Alechinsky, Le Musee de Poche, Pans, 

1971 

Les estampes de 1946 a 1972, Yves Riviere, Paris, 1973. 

Catalogue raisonne 

Freddy de Vree, Alechinsky, Kunstpocket, no. 3, Schel- 

derode, Belgium, 1976 

Jean-Clarence Lambert, Central Park, Yves Riviere, 

Paris, 1976 

Appel et Alechinsky: Encres a deux pinceaux et leurs 

poemes par Hugo Claus, Yves Riviere-A.M.G., Paris, 

1978. Preface by Christian Dotremont 

Hugo Claus, Treize manieres de regarder un fragment 
d' Alechinsky, Ziggurat, Antwerp, 1979 
Michel Butor and Michel Sicard, Alechinsky: Frontieres 
et bordures, Collection Renault Art et Industrie, Edi- 
tions Galilee, Paris, 1984 

Max Loreau, Alechinsky, Reperes no. 16, Daniel 
Lelong, Paris, 1984 

Michel Butor and Michel Sicard, Alechinsky dans le 
texte, Editions Galilee, Paris, 1985 
Pierre Descargues, Alechinsky, bouches et grilles, Re- 
peres no. 29, Daniel Lelong, Paris, 1986 
Lefebre Gallery 1960-86: Alechinsky, Suite of 18 
catalogues, New York, 1986 

ON COBRA 

Willemi]n Stokvis, Cobra, De Bezige Bij, Amsterdam, 1974 
Cobra 1948-1911, Jean-Michel Place, Paris, 1980. Re- 
prints of publications and documents, including 
"Cobra, qu'est-ce que c'est?," by Christian Dotremont 
Jean-Clarence Lambert, Cobra: un art libre, Fonds Mer- 
cator, Antwerp, Le Chene, Paris, 1983, and Cobra, 
trans. Roberta Bailey, New York, Abbeville Press, 1983 
Christian Dotremont, Isabelle, texts on Cobra 1948- 
1978, La Pierre d'Alun, Brussels, 1985 



Bougival, 1; 




169 



PHOTOGRAPHIC CREDITS 




COLOR 

Christian Andersen: cat. no. 74 

David Aschkenas: cat. no. 40 

Courtesy Norman and Irma Braman: cat. no. 61 

Courtesy Musee National d'Art Moderne, Centre 

Georges Pompidou, Paris: cat. no. 9 

David Heald: cover, cat. no. 48 

David Heald and Myles Aronowitz: cat. no. 29 

Courtesy Lefebre Gallery, New York: cat. no. 43 

Mirko Lion: cat. no. 25 

Courtesy Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 

Humlebaek, Denmark: cat. no. 32 

© 1987, Daniel J. Martinez: cat. no. 7 

Courtesy Gallene Maeght Lelong, Paris: cat. no. 8 

Eric Mitchell: cat. no. 1 1 

© Andre Morain: 

75. 8z 

O. E. Nelson: cat. 

Thomas Peder: 



nos. 23, 3», 59, 4- 



■ nos. 44, 45 
and Poul Pedersen: cat. no. 21 



BLACK AND WHITE 

Myles Aronowitz: cat. nos. 89, 90, 92, 94, 98, 99, 100, 

103, 108 

David Heald: cat. nos. 88, 91, 93, 95, 96, 104, 106 

Galerie de France, Paris: cat. no. 10 

© Andre Morain: cat. nos. 4-6, 8, 19, 24, 26-28, 31, 4 

57-60, 63, 66-72, 76, 77, 80, 81, 83, 84, 107 

Courtesy Musee National d'Art Moderne, Centre 

Georges Pompidou, Paris: cat. no. 2 

Otto E. Nelson: cat. nos. 3, 12 

Michel Nguyen, © Galerie Maeght Lelong, Paris: cat. 

nos. 14-18, 65, 85, 87 



Mounting of Past Unnoticed, Gust of 
Wind in progress, Bougival, 1 98 1 



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173 



Exhibition 87/1 

5000 copies of this catalogue, designed by Malcolm Grear Designers 

and typeset by Sehooley Graphics/Prime Line Phototype, 

have been printed by Eastern Press in January 1987 for 

the Trustees of The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation on the 

occasion of the exhibition Pierre Alechinsky: Margin and Center. 



I 74 



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